Kansas Highway 1

A1
Length: 13.36 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line, continues south as OK 34
North Endpoint: Junction US 160-183 6 miles south of Coldwater.
Counties Passed through: Comanche, Kiowa, Edwards, Pawnee, Rush, Ellis, Rooks, Phillips

History

K-1 originally ran north from Comanche through Greensburg, Kinsley, La Crosse, Hays, Stockton, and Philipsburg before reaching K-22, later US 83, near the Nebraska Border. In the fall of 1938, US 183 was extended south, following K-1 between the junction with US 160 south of Comanche and the junction with US 36 at Phillipsburg. By the fall of 1941, the alignments of US 83 and US 183 were switched north of US 36, and all of K-1 north of US 160 was re-designated as US 183.

In 1932, K-1 was gravel between US 160 at Coldwater and US 54 at Greensburg, between US 50S at Kinsley and US 50N at Rozel, and between K-96 at Rush Center, past US 40S at Hays, to Northern Ellis County. By 1938, K-1 had been gravelled in its entirety, and hard-surfaced between Coldwater and Greensburg, between K-4 at Lacrosse and Hays, and between the Ellis/Rooks County line and K-18 at Plainville. By 1941, only the Kinsley-Rozel segment and the segment between the State Line and US 160 remained gravel.

The surviving segment of K-1 was hard-surfaced by 1953.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Kansas Highway 2

A2
Length: 61.52 miles
Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 281 west of Kiowa
Northeast Endpoint: Junction K-42 west of Suppesville
Counties Passed through: Barber, Harper, Kingman, Sumner, Sedgwick
K-2 is a diagonal route in the southern part of Kansas.  It starts at US 281 4 miles west of Kiowa, close to the Border, run east to Anthony, then jogs north 6 miles to US 160. K-2 follows 160 to Just east of Harper, where it runst northeast to K-42 near Suppesville.

History

The second K-2 started out as an route between K-14 near Harper, heading on a northeastward path towards the Harper/Kingman County line, then briefly east along the county line, then north to K-42 near Norwich on an new gravel alignment by 1937. The 1945 State Highway Commission map shows the Kingman County segment as dirt, though previous maps show it as gravel. The Harper County segment was paved by 1950 and the Kingman County segment was realigned, continuing northeast and meeting K-42 in northwest Sumner County 3 miles east of Norwich.

By 1963, K-2 was extended in both directions, duplexing with K-14 from Harper to Kiowa then on K-8 south from Kiowa to the Oklahoma line, and also with K-42 northeast into Wichita. By 1977, K-2 was removed from K-8 south of Kiowa and designated on K-14 from Kiowa west to US 281.

By 1995, the K-2/K-14 duplex was designated as K-2, and the K-2/K-42 duplex was designated as K-42.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Kansas Highway 2 (1926-1931)

DP502
West Endpoint: Colorado State Line west of St. Francis. Continued west as CO 102
East Endpoint: Junction K-22 at Norton
Counties Passed through: Cheyenne, Rawlins, Decatur, Norton
K-3 runs runs through the Osage Questas region in southeast Kansas, heading north from K-47 through Brazilton and Hepler, meeting K-146 along the way. K-3 rides west briefly with K-39 before heading north to Uniontown and US 54. K-3 rides with 54 northwestly to Bronson, where K-3 turns back north, meeting K-65 in northwest Bourban county before ending at K-31.

History

The first K-2 was the original designation for US 36 west of Norton.

Kansas Highway 3

A3
Length: 43.26 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-47 6 miles west of Girard
North Endpoint: Junction K-31 3 miles west of Blue Mound
Counties Passed through: Crawford, Bourbon, Linn
Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Kansas Highway 4

A4
Length: 370.10 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 83 North of Scott City
East Endpoint: Junction US 59 Southeast of Nortonville
Counties Passed through: Scott, Lane, Ness, Rush, Barton, Rice, Ellsworth, McPherson, Saline, Dickinson, Morris, Wabaunsee, Shawnee, Jefferson, Atchison

K-4 starts east from US 83 8 miles north of Scott City in the high plains of western Kansas. It heads east to US 283 at Ransom and US 183 at LaCrosse before meeting US 281 near Hoisington. K-4 follows 281 briefly before continuing east through the Smoky Hills and the towns of Claflin, Fredreick, and Geneseoo. Near Lindsborg in Saline County, K-4 encounters I-135/US 81 and folows the interstate for 4 miles before turning east into the Flint Hills. K-4 meets US 77 near Herrington in Dickinson County and heads through the towns of Latimer, White City, and Dwight before meeting K-99 and joining the highway for 10 miles into Eskridge. K-4 proceeds northeast to I-70 west of Topeka. K-4 rides on I-70 through Topeka before turning north on the Oakland Expressway toward US 24. K-4 crosses US 24 via a pair of offset interchanges, then turns northeast through Meriden and Valley Falls before meeting US 59 southeast of Nortonville.

History

The original alignment for K-4 east from Herrington was along US 50N to Council Grove, then it stair stepped to the northeast to K-11 at Eskridge, and on to Topeka, entering Topeka on 21st Street, turning north on Gage Blvd, crossing K-10 at 10th Street and following 6th Street east to Topeka Boulevard, where it joins US 75, US 40, and K-10 across the Topeka Boulevard Bridge. K-4 followed US 75 before turning due east to Meriden, then Stair stepped northeast to Valley Falls to K-24 at Valley Falls, followed K-24 east to US 73W, then followed 73W north to Nortonville, then headed northeast to Atchison, where it crossed the Missouri River and became MO 4. It was dirt west of La Crosse and between Council Grove and Eskridge, and hard surfaced between Marquette and Lindsborg, between Hope and Herrington, between Dover and Meriden, and between the south junction with US 73W and Atchison.

By 1936, US 73W south of Nortonville and K-4 between Nortonville and Atchison had been re-designated as US 59, and K-24 was re-designated as K-16. K-4 was duplexed with K-16 and US 59 between Valley Falls and Atchison. The segment between Valley Falls and Nortonville was sealed, and the dirt segment between La Crosse and the Ness/Lane county line had been graveled By 1941, K-4 in Scott and Lane Counties, as well as the Dirt section in Morris County, had been graveled, and K-4 was hard surfaced between McCracken and La Crosse and between Hoisington and Bushton. By 1945, the dirt segment in Wabaunsee County had also been graveled. By 1953, K-4 had been hard-surfaced between the west end at US 83 and US 283 at Ransom, and between the North Junction with US 81 north of Lindsborg and Herrington.

The old Brickyard bridge across the Kansas River in Topeka was destroyed in the 1951 flood, and a new bridge was constructed half a mile to the west. When the new Westgate bridge and adjoining roadway opened in 1955, it received the K-4 designation. From the north end of the Westgate, K-4 followed US 24 east to US 75.

By 1956, the sections from US 283 to McCracken, from Bushton to Crawford, and from Eskridge to Dover were paved. The final gravel sections of K-4 were eliminated by 1957 when the segment between Crawford and Marquette was paved, and the segment between Council Grove and Eskridge was bypassed when K-10 between Herrington and K-99, including a new road east out of Alta Vista, was re-designated as K-4, with K-4 following K-99 from the former K-10/K-99 junction east to Eskridge. By 1962, the Westgate bridge had been designated as Bypass US 75/K-4 and K-4 had been removed from Gage Boulevard and was moved onto I-70 between the Westgate bridge and Auburn Road, then south on Auburn Road to 21st.

In the early 60's, the stair step route between Meriden and Valley Falls was straightened. The south half of new roadway was completed by 1962, along with a new diagonal route between Nortonville and Cummings. The northern half of the diagonal was completed by 1963. By 1965, the diagonal roadway had been extended to US 24 at the Shawnee/Jefferson county line, with K-4 continuing east on US 24 from US 75 to the new roadway.

By 1969, US 59 was shifted onto a new route in northern Jefferson County. K-4 was not shifted onto the new route, and remained on the old US 59 until a new diagonal alignment was completed between Valley Falls and Nortonville by 1978.

When the new Oakland Expressway was completed in 1997, it was designated as K-4, and K-4 through Topeka was moved from US 24 to I-70. Initially, the Oakland Expressway ended at US 40/6th Avenue, and K-4 followed US 40 along 6th Avenue and the Deer Creek Parkway west to I-70. When the new East Topeka interchange opened in 2001, the Oakland Expressway was connected directly to I-70, and K-4 and US 40 were moved onto the new interchange.

The 1929 and 1931 State Highway Commission maps designate K-4 west of La Crosse as K-52 instead. All other maps have shown this as K-4, including a 1927 map, however.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

43327
At the junction of K-4 with US 59, the through route is eastbound K-4 to northbound US 59 and southbound US 59 to westbound K-4. Traffic wishing to continue on US 59 has to make a turn and stop for traffic on the through route. Fortunately, the roadway is divided, so drivers only have to face one direction at a time.

43368
The junction assembly for US 159/K-4A on southbound US 59 near Nortonville also features a reassurance marker for westbound K-4, which begins just past the US 159 junction.

43369
Here's the guide assembly directing southbound `US 59 traffic at the US 159/K-4A junction. Technically, there should be a "TO" marker between the US 59 and K-4 markers.

43531
A new recreational guide sign has been installed along I-70 for the Native Stone Scenic Byway, which goes along K-4 in Shawnee and Wabaunsee counties. The new sign features a inset black border on the K-4 shield.

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Alternate Kansas Highway 4

A4
South Endpoint: Junction K-4 South of Nortonville
Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 59 east of Nortonville
Counties Passed through: Jefferson

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

43368
The junction assembly for US 159/K-4A on southbound US 59 near Nortonville also features a reassurance marker for westbound K-4, which begins just past the US 159 junction.

43369
Here's the guide assembly directing southbound `US 59 traffic at the US 159/K-4A junction. Technically, there should be a "TO" marker between the US 59 and K-4 markers.

Kansas Highway 5

A5
Length: 23.3 miles
Northwest Endpoint: Junction US 73/K-7 In Lansing
Southeast Endpoint: Junction US 69 in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Leavenworth, Wyandotte
K-5 runs from US 73/K-7 in Levenworth along the West Bank of the Missouri River to I-435. After jogging south three miles on 435, K-5 picks up Levenworth Road for 8 miles to I-635 follows 635 briefly, the pushes on to US 69 in The Fairfax district of Kansas City, Kansas.

History

K-5 was paved in Wyandotte County by 1932. The Leavenworth County segment was graveled by 1933 and paved by 1941.

The construction of Wyandotte County Lake caused a gap in the original K-5 route. A new alignment around the west side of the lake was posted as "Detour K-5," with the unaffected part of the old alignment maintained by the state. The detour lasted until I-435 was completed in the area by 1987, and K-5 was re-routed on 435 between Wolcott Drive and Leavenworth Road.

I-635 was originally planned to turn east just north of K-5, meet US 69, then turn north and cross into Missouri on the Fairfax. By 1969, the plans were changed so that 635 crossed the Missouri River on a new bridge. To compensate for the relocation of I-635, a spur to the Fairfax District was constructed. The new freeway was completed around 1976, and was subsequently designated as K-5.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

36332
Just north of the Leavenworth Road interchange on I-435 is this guide sign for the next three exits: Donahoo Road, Wolcott Drive, and Route 45. "Route 45" is Missouri State Highway 45. Plans for replacement of this sign do feature a MO 45 shield. 24 February 2009

36334
North of the newly-built Donahoo Road interchange is this new sign on I-435 for Wolcott Drive, and Route 45. Not only is the MO 45 interchange spelled out again, but the interchange with NW Barry Road referenced on a previous sign has been eliminated. A new sign is slated to be installed with a MO 45 shield, but without a reference to Barry Road. 24 February 2009

36371
On I-635, this sign features two different state markers, K-5 and MO 9 10 March 2009

36389
This guide sign just north of the Missouri River on southbound I-635 features exits for K-5 and Parallel Parkway in KCK. The detour sign for US 69 is posted because the Fairfax Bridge was closed at the time. 10 March 2009

46749
The west end of the K-5 freeway spur into the Fairfax district features a grassy median 26 May 2013

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Kansas Highway 6

D506
South Endpoint: Junction US 73W/US 169 at Erie
North Endpoint: Junction K-7 at Osowatomie
Counties Passed through: Labette, Neosho, Allen, Anderson, Franklin, Miami

History

K-6 ran from K-57 east of Erie, heading north to Kincaid, then turned west to Lone Elm, then north to US 73W, followed 73W to Garnett before turning northeast through Greeley before ending at K-7 near Osawatomie. K-6 was a dirt road from Greeley to Osawatomie, hard surfaced from Elsmore to Mildred, and gravel along the rest of the route. Hard-surfacing had extended from Mildred to Kincaid by 1933. The Osawatomie-Garnett segment was re-designated US 169 in 1934.

By 1940, K-6 had been aligned on a new route, with the new K-6 running north from US 59 at Erie to K-39, then east on K-39 to Stark. The segment between K-39 and Stark was paved by 1940, and from Stark to Elsmore by 1945.

By 1950, US 59 had been moved to the north. The segment between Erie and K-39 was re-designed as US 59/K-6 and had been hard-surfaced. By 1953, the remaining gravel segment between Kincaid and Garnett had been hard-surfaced.

K-6 had been re-designated as US 59 in its entirety by 1962

Kansas Highway 7

A7
Length: 243.57 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line, north of Picher, Oklahoma (concurrent with US 69)
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line north of White Cloud
Counties Passed through: Cherokee, Crawford, Bourbon, Linn, Miami, Johnson, Wyandotte, Leavenworth, Atchison, Doniphan

K-7 starts at the Oklahoma line concurrant with US 69. K-7 remains with US 69 until Columbus, then proceeds north through Scammon, Cherokee, and Girard before meeting K-39 in southern Bourbon county. At K-39, 7 turns east, then northeast, meeting up with US 69 again, which it follows into Fort Scott.

At Fort Scott, K-7 follows US 54 west out of Fort Scott before turning north, stair-stepping northwest through the Osage Questas, meeting K-31 in northern Bourbon county and crossing K-52 at Mound City. South of Osawatomie, K-7 encounters US 169, which it follows to Olathe in the Kansas City metro area.

At Olathe, K-7 proceeds north, crossing K-10 near Lenexa and K-32 near Downtown Bonner Springs before encountering I-70, and picking up US 24, 40, and US 73 on the north side of Bonner Springs. 24 and 40 join K-7 for about a mile before departing at State Avenue, while US 73 remains with K-7, crossing K-92 at Leavenworth before finally parting ways at US 59 in Atchison.

From Atchison, K-7 proceeds north, crossing US 36 west of Troy before turning northwest, paralleling the Missouri river through Fanning and White Cloud before terminating at the Nebraska line. The road continues as a county road to Rulo.

History

K-7 initially had its north end US 40 near Bonner Springs. By 1932, K-7 was hard-surfaced from the Bourbon/Crawford County line north to K-38, from the Miami/Linn County line to Paola, from Bonita to Olathe, along the concurrency with K-10, and from Bonner Springs north to US 40. A segment in the southern half of Linn County was also dirt. By 1933, the dirt segment in Linn County was graveled, and the road was hard surfaced in Cherokee and Crawford Counties.

In 1936, US 69 and US 169 were designated in Kansas. US 69 was moved to K-7 south of Fort Scott, and a new diagonal alignment was built southwest from US 69. This stretch was graveled by 1937, and hard-surfaced by 1950. US 169 was designated along K-7 from Osawatomie to Olathe and had been hard-surfaced from Paola north to the junction with K-68. K-7 was also extended north along US 73 to Atchison, then replaced K-16 from Atchison to US 36 at Troy. The former K-16 was hard surfaced.

In 1937, K-7 was extended north from Troy northwest along US 36 along a new alignment, ending at the Nebraska line northwest of White Cloud. The new K-7 north of US 36 was graveled by 1937 and hard surfaced by 1953. The US 169/K-7 segment was paved from K-68 to Spring Hill between 1937 and 1940. K-7 was paved between K-10 and Bonner Springs by 1941. K-7 in Linn County was hard surfaced from south to north between 1953 and 1957

By 1957, a new Kansas River bridge was built at Bonner Springs, an K-7 bypassed Bonner on the east side before meeting the old alignment north of town. Past the new interchange on the Kansas Turnpike (also I-70), K-7 angled northwest, meeting US 24/40/73 at a cloverleaf interchange. By 1971, K-7 had been widened to four lanes along the concurrency with K-10. By 1982, K-7 had been widened from the new K-10 freeway north to the Kansas River bridge, and from I-70 north to the US 24/40/73 interchange. By 1986, K-7 was widened between the Kansas River and I-70. The final stretch of K-7 was widened by 1995.

In 2008, the interchange with US 24/40/73 at State Avenue was closed for reconstruction into a six-ramp partial cloverleaf, with the loop ramps from eastbound State Ave. to northbound K-7, and from westbound State Ave. to southbound K-7 removed. Upon completion of the new interchange in 2009, State Ave. east of K-7 was turned back to the Unified government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City Kansas, and K-7 between State Ave. and I-70 re-designated as US 24/40/73 and K-7.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

36103
14 February 2009

36104
14 February 2009

36105
14 February 2009

36106
14 February 2009

36125
At the ramp from I-70 onto K-7, the replacement markers are posted on much taller poles so that the addition of US 24, US 40, and US 73 are properly included. 14 February 2009

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Kansas Highway 8 (Northern Segment)

A8
Length: 0.7 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 West of Athol
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (CG/JJW) south of Franklin, Neb. Continues north as NE 10.
Counties Passed through: Barber, Pratt, Stafford, Barber, Russell, Osborne, Smith

History

K-8 was initially a continuous highway from Oklahoma to Nebraska. In 1932, most of the road was dirt, with gravel segments between US 50N at Great Bend and K-4 at Hosington and between Osborne and Portis. By 1933, K-8 was gravel between the Oklahoma line and Medicine Lodge, between Saint John and Great Bend, between Waldo and Luray, and between Portis and Smith Center. In addition, the segment between Great Bend and Hosington was hard-surfaced. By 1936, K-8 had been gravelled between Sawyer and Saint John and between Hoisington and Russel, with the Portis-Smith Center segment sealed. By 1937, K-8 had been hard-surfaced between Pratt and Saint John, between the Stafford/Barton county line and Great Bend, and from Osborne to Portis.

Around 1940, K-8 between Smith Center and Kiowa was re-designated as US 281. The segment between Smith Center and the Nebraska line retained the K-8 designation, while the segment between the Oklahoma line and Kiowa was designated K-11 At the time of the change, K-8/US 281 had been hard surfaced between the Barton/Russell County line and Russell, and between Saint John and the Stafford/Barton county line.

Part of the northern segment of K-8, out of Athol, was gravelled by 1941. The remainder of the road remained dirt until the entire northern segment was hard-surfaced by 1950.

Kansas Highway 8 (Northern Segment)

A8
Length: 16 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line South of Kiowa
North Endpoint: Junction K-2 in Kiowa
Counties Passed through: Barber

History

In a December, 1959 memo, the State Highway Commission's Engineer of Highway Planning notified the State Highway Commission that what was K-11 was being discontinued and re-designated as K-8, creating two segments of what was originally a continuous highway

By the time the K-8 designation was restored to the Barber County segment, it had been hard surfaced.

Kansas Highway 9

A9
Length: 317.94 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-123 South of Dresdem
East Endpoint: Junction US 73 near Lancaster
Counties Passed through: Sheridan, Decatur, Norton, Phillips, Smith, Osborne, Mitchell, Cloud, Washington, Marshall, Nemaha, Jackson, Atchison

K-9 begins at K-123 along the Decatur-Sheridan county line before turning east, staying along the north bank of the North fork of the Solomon River, meeting and joining US 283 in Norton County. After passing through the communities of Logan and Speed, K-9 crosses US 183 at Glade before passing by Kirwin and Gaylord, then meets US 281 east of Gaylord.

K-9 follows US 281 southeast along the Solomon before meeting US 24 south of Portis. K-9 follows 24 east through Downs, Cawker City, Glen Elder, and Solomon Rapids before departing US 24 north of Beloit. From Beloit, K-9 turns east, then stair steps north to US 81 in Concordia. From Concordia, K-9 heads east through Clyde and Clifton before meeting K-15 along the Washington-Clay county line.

K-9 follows K-15 north, passing Palmer and Linn before turning east along K-148. K-9 and K-148 remained joined for 10 miles passing near the communities of Greenleaf and Barnes before 148 turns north and 9 continues east to US 77 near Waterville. From Waterville, K-9 and US 77 continue east to Blue Rapids and cross the Big Blue River before US 77 continues north and K-99 continues east to K-99 at Frankfort. K-9 follows K-99 north for two miles before heading east near Viets, Vermillion, and Centralia beforre hitting K-63 north of Corning.

K-9 follows K-63 south to Corning before turning east to Goff, then heads southeast through Wetmore, crossing US 75 near Netawaka and passing through Whiting before hitting US 159 north of Muscotah. K-9 follows US 159 as it stair-steps sotheast to Effingham. East of Effingham, K-9 stair-steps northeast, ending at US 73 near Lancaster.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Kansas Highway 10

A10
Length: 37.90 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 50N at Herrington (1927-1956); Junction US 40, 6th and Iowa Street, Lawrence (1956-1996); I-70/Kansas Turnpike Exit 197 northwest of Lawrence (1996-)
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line, Kansas City (1926-1984); I-435 exit 1B (de facto)/I-35 exit 222 (de jure) in Lenexa (1984-)
Counties Passed through: Dickinson, Morris, Wabaunsee, Shawnee, Jefferson, Douglas, Johnson, Wyandotte

Starting at the Lecompton interchange of I-70 and the Turnpike, K-10 traverses south, interchanging with US 40 and skirting around Clinton Lake before turning east to US 59. K-10 follows 59 north about a mile and a half through the southern end of Lawrence before turning east again. Once out of Lawrence, K-10 races across the Kansas River valley, racing through Eudora and De Soto and skirting the northern edge of Olathe before ending at the southwest corner of the I-435 beltway about a mile short of I-35.

History

In 1929, K-10 began at US 50N at Herington, proceeded north and east through White City, Dwight, Alta Vista, and Alma, and McFarland before turning east at Paxico and entering Topeka on 10th Avenue to US 75, then north across the Kansas River at the Topeka Boulevard bridge. Once across the river, K-10 followed the north bank of the river, and turned east through Grantville, Newman, and Perry before meeting US 73W at Williamstown. K-10 followed US 73W through Lawrence before turning east to Kansas City. By 1932, K-10 had been paved from Kansas City west to the Douglas/Johnson County line, and from Lawrence to Grantville; as well as gravel from the Douglas/Johnson County line to Lawrence, west out of Topeka to Valencia Road, and between Paxico and Alma.

In May 1935, the road was in the process of being paved from the Douglas/Johnson County Line to Eudora, and bids were taken to finish paving the road west to Lawrence. A Newspaper article from May 1935 indicated that the newly-paved roadway would feature an "experimental" section - a 20-foot road on 120-foot right of way, with shoulders and ditches to meet the specifications of a "modal highway" At the same time, the highway was being paved from Topeka to Valencia Road, and graveled from Paxico to Alma as well as Alta Vista to Dwight. The May 1935 article indicated that K-10 would be rerouted on the alignment of US 40 south of the Kansas River, while US 40 would follow K-10's alignment north of the river, easing congestion in Downtown Lawrence. K-10 was routed onto US 40's alignment, but US 40 was not re-routed. Instead, US 24 was introduced, extending west into Kansas City and taking K-10's northern alignment, with the southern alignment from designated as US 40/K-10.

By 1941, the alignment between Valencia Road and Paxico was straightened and graveled, and graveled from Alta Vista to Herington. By 1954, the entire route was paved between Topeka and Alma and between Alta Vista and Dwight. The part between Dwight and Herington was paved by 1956. At the same time, a new connection from K-99 between Eskridge and Alma was built west to Alta Vista, bypassing the last unpaved section of K-10 (which had been graveled). In 1957, K-10 between K-99 and Topeka was re-designated as US 40, and K-10 between Herington and K-99 was re-designated as K-4, shifting the west end of K-10 to Lawrence.

Prior to 1956, K-10 and US 73W (later US 59) were routed along Massachusetts Street through Downtown Lawrence to US 40. When a new road, today known as Iowa Street, was built on what was then the west side of town, K-10 and US 59 were routed along it to 40.

The K-10 Freeway began construction in 1974. The first section completed was the section from Lexington Avenue in DeSoto to K-7 north of Olathe, which opened to traffic on November 8, 1976. The section from Lawrence to DeSoto opened in 1978. The section from K-7 east to I-435, at first known as K-12, began construction in 1980. In August of 1982, the grading was completed, but work stopped until the beginning of 1984. The last stretch of road was completed December 18, 1984. At the time the freeway was being planned, the highway commission considered re-aligning K-10 to bypass Lawrence. Although the bypass was dropped, it would be revived by Douglas County.

The South Lawrence Trafficway was first proposed by the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce in 1985. Douglas County issued $4 million in bonds to entice KDOT to fund the route. A 1987 lawsuit by Les Blevins of rural Lawrence challenged the county's authority to issue the bonds without a public vote. Ultimately, the Kansas Supreme Court ruled that Douglas County should have held a vote, initially ordering the bonds suspended pending a vote. Later, the ruling would be revised to indicate that Douglas County's bond issue could proceed without a vote; however, similar issues in the future would require a public vote before the bonds are issued. A referendum on the SLT bonds was held in November of 1990 in favor of the road. Opponents sued again, saying that a explanatory statement was biased. The Kansas Supreme Court ruled in 1992 that due to the circumstances, the referendum was advisory, meaning that the county could legally proceed on the trafficway even if the referendum had been rejected.

The SLT began construction on the western leg in 1994 and completed in late 1996. In 1993, Haskell Indian Nations University complained that the SLT as proposed would negatively affect the university, particularly cultural and religious practices held along the south end, near where the trafficway was to be built. The Federal Highway Administration ordered a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement drafted. The parties could not agree on a final routing, so the Federal Highway Administration attempted to withdraw from the project. A lawsuit by trafficway opponents successfully resulted in an injunction that suspended any construction activity until the SEIS was completed. The lack of consensus remained, and the final SEIS was published with a "no action" decision to remove the court injunctions. Soon afterward, KDOT started the process on a new EIS, with a 32nd Street alignment, approximately 1/8 mile south of 31st, and relocating 31st off of the Haskell right of way, as well as a more extensive mitigation proposal for the Baker Wetlands than previously discussed. The Final EIS, released in early 2003, approves the 32nd Street alignment. It was subsequently adopted by the Federal Highway Administration in February 2008. Opponents to the 32nd Street alignment, led by the Prairie Band Pottawatomie tribe, filed a suit against the Federal Highway Administration and KDOT challenging that the 2003 EIS was biased toward the 32nd Street alternative, that an alignment suggested by the tribe had been improperly rejected, the noise study was done incorrectly, and that the cost of the 32nd Street alternative was under-estimated. The US District Court ruled in November 2010 that the noise study was not properly done, and that the cost of the 32nd Street alignment was under-estimated; however, the court also rejected the allegation of bias and the tribe's suggestion had been properly considered and rejected, ultimately finding in favor of the FHwA and KDOT. The plaintiffs filed an appeal of the ruling in April 2011. Part of the mitigation area on the west side of the existing wetlands was completed in 2010. The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the District Court's decision in July, 2012. Funding for completion of the SLT was announced in June, 2011. Letting is slated for September, 2013, with completion of the Trafficway estimated to be in 2015.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

32240
Apparently, someone has slipped on the ice, as it is clear that the sign for Lexington Avenue on eastbound K-10 has been knocked out of place by an errant vehicle. 13 December 2007

38352
The detour for Douglas County Road 438 involves K-10 and US 40. At the K-10/US 40 interchanges, drivers taking the detour are implored to "Exit Now." 31 October 2009

38416
When the Turnpike was widened between Lecompton and East Topeka, a the ground-mounted exit sign for K-10 had to be replaced with one mouted overhead. The new mounting uses a 20-petal shield instead of the standard 16. 31 October 2009

41856
Here's a view from the Winchester road bridge over K-10 looking east. 14 May 2011

41858
The markings on the median of K-10 under Winchester road indicate that is a favorite spot for law enforcement to run radar. 14 May 2011

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Spur Kansas Highway 10 (1970-1985)

West Endpoint: Junction K-10 at Shawnee Mission Parkway and Merriam Lane
East Endpoint: Junction I-35 and Shawnee Mission Parkway
Counties Passed through: Johnson

History

This Spur of K-10 was created around 1970, when US 169 was moved from Merriam Lane to Rainbow Boulevard in Johnson County. Previously, US 169 followed the Shawnee Mission Parkway (and its predecessor) west from the junction with I-35 (and US 50 before that). When the Shawnee Mission Parkway/Merriam Lane segment of K-10 was re-designated as K-12, the spur was changed accordingly

Kansas Highway 11 (2013-)

A11
South Endpoint: Junction US 54-400 west of Kingman.
North Endpoint: Junction K-61 southwest of Arlington
Counties Passed through: Kingman, Reno

History

As part of the deal for widening K-61 to four lanes, Reno County agreed to take over K-14 between Arlington and Sterling. K-61 was completed in 2012. To avoid excessive route number duplication, in 2013, the Secretary of Transportation elected to re-route K-14 to turn east at Kingman, replace K-17 to Hutchinson, then follow K-96 from Hutchinson to Sterling. The segment of K-14 that remained a state highway was re-designated as K-11.

Kansas Highway 11 (1926-1938)

DP5011
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line South of Chautauqua
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (Junction N-65) North of Summerfield
Counties Passed through: Chautauqua, Elk, Greenwood, Lyon, Wabaunsee, Pottawatomie, Marshall

History

K-11 initially turned west at Chautauqua to end at Elgin. By 1932, K-11 was hard-surfaced from Moline to Howard, and from south of Emporia to US 50N at Admire. K-11 was also gravel from Howard to Sevry, from Madison to Emporia, from Admire to Eskridge, and from Frankfort to Beattie. The following year, K-11 was paved from Howard to Madison, and graveled in the remainder of Marshall County, leaving the segment south of Moline and from Eskridge to the Pottawatomie/Marshall County line dirt.

By 1936, K-11 was graveled from Chautauqua to Moline, and re-aligned to meet Oklahoma Highway 48 at the state line. K-11 was also graveled north from Alma to just North of Wamego, as well as north out of Westmoreland, leaving two stretches (Eskridge to Alma and Wamego to Westmoreland) dirt. The gravel segment between Madison and Emporia was also paved. By 1938, the remaining dirt segments had been graveled.

On May 17, 1938, Oklahoma re-designated their highway 48 as highway 99, K-11 was also re-designated K-99 to match the new Oklahoma number. The Oklahoma records which show the re-designation indicate that Nebraska was also slated to follow suit; however, Nebraska apparently designated their NE 99 on a new alignment close by. The NE 99 and NE 65 designations were not switched until 1962.

Kansas Highway 11 (1940-1959)

D5011
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line South of Kiowa
North Endpoint: Junction K-14 in Kiowa.
Counties Passed through: Barber

History

Around 1940, K-8 between Smith Center and Kiowa was re-designated US 281. The former K-8 between the Oklahoma line and Kiowa was re-designated K-11. At the time it was re-designated, it was still a gravel roadway.

The road was paved sometime between 1953 and 1956.

In a December, 1959 memo, the State Highway Commission's Engineer of Highway Planning notified the State Highway Commission that K-11 was being discontinued and the K-8 designation restored.

Kansas Highway 12 (1985-1987)

D8012
Southwest Endpoint: Junction K-7 on Shawnee Mission Parkway
Northeast Endpoint: Missouri State Line on Southwest Blvd, Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Johnson, Wyandotte

History

K-12 began as the designation for a proposed freeway from K-7 east to I-35 along 103rd Street. The plan was later revisited when I-435 was extended to become a full beltway. 435 was extended west from I-35 for one mile, then turned north. By 1977, K-10 was being upgraded from Lawrence east to Kansas City. A new freeway alginment was shown on official state maps between 1977 and 1981 as K-12. By 1984, the alignment was officially designated as K-10. Once the new K-10 opened in December of 1984, the original K-10 between K-7 and the Missouri line was re-designated as K-12

By 1987, K-12 was entirely within the city limits of Shawnee, Merriam, and Kansas City. As a result, K-12 was turned back to the respective cities and removed from the State Highway system.

Kansas Highway 12 (1926-1937)

DP5012
West Endpoint: Junction K-27 at Richfield
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line East of Frontenac (1926-1932), Junction US 54-83 (1932-1937)
Counties Passed through: Morton, Stevens, Meade, Clark, Comanche, Kiowa, Barber, Harper, Sumner, Cowley, Chautauqua, Montgomery, Labette, Cherokee

History

K-12 was the original designation for much of what is now US 160 prior to US 160's initial designation in 1930. The segment between Richfield and US 54 remained until it was re-designated as an extension of K-51 in 1937.

Kansas Highway 12 (1940-1950)

D5012
West Endpoint: Junction US 66 in Baxter Springs
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line East of Baxter Springs
Counties Passed through: Cherokee

History

The K-12 designation was revived for a new highway between US 66 and the State Border in the southeast corner of the state. Starting out as a dirt road, the highway was quickly improved to hard-surface. By 1950, Missouri had conneceted this roadway into Joplin, and the road was re-designated as an extension of US 166.

Spur Kansas Highway 12 (1985-1987)

West Endpoint: Junction K-12 at the Shawnee Mission Parkway/Merriam Lane interchange
East Endpoint: Junction I-35 and Shawnee Mission Parkway
Counties Passed through: Johnson

History

The Spur of K-12 was formerly a spur of K-10. It was re-designated as a spur of K-12 when the Shawnee Mission Parkway and Merriam Lane were re-designated from K-10 to K-12. The designation was removed when the K-12 was removed from the highway system in 1987 along with it's parent.

Kansas Highway 13

A13
Length: 14.6 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 24 Northwest of Rocky Ford
North Endpoint: Junction K-16 South of Fostoria
Counties Passed through: Butler, Chase, Morris, Geary, Riley, Pottawatomie, Marshall

History

K-13 originally ran from US 77 near DeGraff through Cassoday, Cottonwood Falls, Council Grove, and Alta Vista to US 40 near Manhattan. Only the section between Matfield Green and Strong City was gravel.

By 1932, the south end was moved from DeGraff to El Dorado. By 1933, the segment between El Dorado and Matfield Green was graveled, and was extended north along a new alignment along the Blue River, crossing the Blue River at Garrison and continuing northeast to K-9 near Barrett. The portion south between Garrison and K-9 was gravel, the remainder remained dirt.

By 1936, K-13 was had been graveled from Council Grove to Alta Vista and from Manhattan to Garrison. The entire route had was gravel by 1945. By 1950, 13 had been hard-surfaced between Strong City and Alta Vista and between Manhattan and Garrison. By 1953, it was hard-surfaced from the new straight shot north to Manhattan. By 1956, the only sections not hard-surfaced were from Strong City north to the Butler/Morris county line, for a short stretch near Alta Vista, and from the junction with K-16 near Randolph to the north end at Barrett.

The filling of the Big Blue River Valley for Tuttle Creek Lake in 1962 flooded K-13 north of Manhattan. As a consequence, K-13 was realigned, heading north from Manhattan, then northeast to K-16 near Fostoria.

By 1965, K-13 south of Manhattan was re-designated as K-177.

Kansas Highway 14

A14
Length: 203.3 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 160 West of Harper
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line southwest of Superior, NE
Counties Passed through: Harper, Kingman, Reno, Rice, Ellsworth, Lincoln, Mitchell, Jewell

K-14 begins at US 160 just west of Harper. From 160, 14 runs due north, intersecting US 54-400 at Kingman, follows 54 west 4 miles, then jogs back north, following K-61 briefly at Arlington and meeting K-96 in northern Reno county. 14 and 96 travel north 10 miles to US 56 at Lyons. K-14 continues north through Reno and Ellsworth Counties until meeting I-70/US 40, where it jogs east about a mile before continuing north. 14 intersects US 24 at Beloit and intersects US 36 near Mankato, following it east 3 miles before continuing north to Nebraska Highway 14.

History

K-14 initially ran from K-44 at Anthony to the Nebraska border near Superior. By 1932, K-44 west of Anthony was re-designated as K-14. By 1932, K-14 was hard surfaced along the segment duplexed with K-96 from Sterling to Lyons, and gravel from the Oklahoma State line to Harper, in central Kingman county, from Lyons to Lincoln, and from Beloit to Manketo. The segment between Anthony and Harper was hard-surfaced by 1933.

By 1936, a new diagonal route was built between Crisfield and Kiowa as a dirt road, and the segment from Beloit to Mankato was hard-surfaced. By 1940, the Kiowa diagonal was graveled, and was hard-surfaced between Lincoln and Beloit. By 1945, 14 was hard-surfaced between the State Line and Anthony, and between US 50S and K-4; The segment between Mankato and Superior was also graveled. By 1950, K-14 was hard surfaced between Anthony and Kingman and between Mankato and Superior. The remaining dirt and gravel sections of K-14 were hard surfaced by 1956.

By 1962, the segment between the Oklahoma line and Anthony was given the joint designation of K-2/K-14. By 1995, the segment west of Anthony was re-designated solely as K-2.

Truck Kansas Highway 14

A14
South Endpoint: Junction K-14 and K-156 south of Ellsworth
North Endpoint: Junction K-14 and K-140 North of Ellsworth
Counties Passed through: Ellsworth

Kansas Highway 15

A15
Length: 206 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line (Junction OK 18)
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line south of Fairbury, NE
Counties Passed through: Cowley, Sumner, Sedgwick, Harvey, Marion, Dickinson, Clay, Washington
K-15 Begins at the Oklahoma Border hand heads north 8 miles to US 166, turns 4 miles west on 166, goes 9 miles north through Dexter before turning left 3 miles to US 160.  15 follows 160 west before turning north on US 77 at Winfield for 10 miles.  15 turns straight west for 6 miles before turning westward to Derby.  After interchanging with I-35 and the Turnpike, 15 joins I-135/US 81, crossing K-96 in North Wichita before continueing north for 27 miles out of Witchita to Newton, where it arrows north to US 56 in Western Marion County, which it follows 6 miles to the east before it rockets across the Flint Hills to Abiline, where it encounters I-70/US 40 before moving venturing another 6 miles to K-18.  After coinciding with 18 for 4 miles, 15 continues its trek across the Flint Hills, meeting US 24 at Clay Center and finding K-9 13 miles to the north, which coincides with it North for 12 miles.  15 encounters US 36 at the town of Washington.  15 follows 36 for 6 miles west before turning north to Nebraska highway 15.
K-15 is limited access from I-135/US 81 to Derby, and is part of the National Highway System from Wichita to US 77

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

47026
The guide sign for the K-15 exit on I-70 in Abilene generally is a good design, but what's up with the typeface on that K-15 shield. 20 July 2013

Kansas Highway 15E

D8015
South Endpoint: Junction K-9/K-15 North of Linn
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line south of Lanham, NE
Counties Passed through: Washington

History

K-15 existed as a "split route" north of Linn. It was the only split 'K' route (US 40, US 50, US 73, and I-35 also had split routes in Kansas at one time or another) and was the last split router in Kansas to be eliminated. The eastern part of the split was re-designated as an extension of K-148 by 1986.

Kansas Highway 15W

D8015
South Endpoint: Junction K-9/K-15 North of Linn
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line south of Fairbury, NE
Counties Passed through: Washington

History

K-15 existed as a "split route" north of Linn. It was the only split 'K' route (US 40, US 50, US 73, and I-35 also had split routes in Kansas at one time or another) and was the last split router in Kansas to be eliminated. The western part of the split was re-designated as K-15 by 1986.

Kansas Highway 16

A16
Length: 109.9 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 77 near Randolph
East Endpoint: Junction US 24-40 in Tonganoxie
Counties Passed through: Riley, Pottawatomie, Jackson, Jefferson, Leavenworth
K-16 begins at US 77 near the small town of Randolph and crossing tuttle Creek Lake and journing east across the rolling hillls of northeast Kansas, meeting US 75 at Holton and going 4 more miles before turning south, then southeast, before pulling east across northern Jeffersonc County to US 59.  16 coincides with 59 to the town of Oskaloosa, then coincides with K-92 to McLouth.  From McLouth, 16 bends southeast before ending at US 24-40 at Tonganoxie.

History

In 1935, US 24 was extended into Kansas, requiring a new designation for the existing highway 24. At the same time, US 59 and US 169 were extended into Kansas, replacing part of the original K-16. The Highway Commission decided to re-designate the remainder of K-16 as an extension of K-7, and reassign the number 16 to the former K-24.[1]

In 1936, K-16 was hard-surfaced from K-62 south of Soldier to US 75 at Holton, and from Valley Falls to Tonganoxie, and gravel from US 77 at Randolph to Fostoria, and from Wheaton to Onaga, and from Holton to Valley Falls[1]. By 1937, the segment from Holton to Valley Falls was hard-surfaced,[2] the highway on the east side of Holton was shifted onto a straighter route[3], and a derivative highway, K-116, was created[4]. By 1940, the segments between Fostoria and Wheaton and from Onaga to K-62 were graveled.[5]

In 1941, the Highway Commission adopted a resolution straitening K-16 east of Onaga.[6] Presumably due to World War II, this project did not get underway until 1950, when it was modified slightly at the Onaga end.[7] The relocation east of Onaga, and the paving of the road east to K-62, was complete by 1953.[8].

History Footnotes

1 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, Apr. 1936. Accessed 13 Sept. 2013

2 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, Feb. 1937. Accessed 13 Sept. 2013

3 Kansas State Highway Commission. Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Jackson County. 7 Jan. 1937. Accessed 14 Sept. 2013

4 Kansas State Highway Commission. [Resolution for Addition of Road in Jackson and Atchison Counties to the State Highway System.] 7 Jan. 1937. Accessed 14 Sept. 2013

5 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, Feb. 1940. Accessed 6 Sept. 2013

6 Kansas State Highway Commission. Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Pottawatomie County. 24 Oct. 1941. Accessed 14 Sept. 2013

7 Kansas State Highway Commission. [Resolution for] Elimination of Road in Pottawatomie County From the State Highway System. 20 Dec. 1950. Accessed 14 Sept. 2013

8 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Official 1956 Kansas Highway Map [map]. 1956. Accessed 6 Sept. 2013

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page


At the north junction of K-16 with Osage Road in Jefferson County, there is a advance-turn marker posted at the intersection where a right-arrow is clearly more appropriate. 22 June 2012

44096
A bit of pre-July 4 patriotic display in a work zone on K-63/K-16 in Pottawatomie County.

44097
12/8/8 signal heads still grace the traffic light at the intersection of 4th Street (K-16/K-116) and New York Avenue in Holton.

47544
Aside from being a rather odd looking K-16 shield, 16 does not turn right up ahead. We're on K-92 in McLouth, and this should really be a K-92 shield. K-16 continues east and west at the stop sign, 92 turns south to west. 29 August 2013

Kansas Highway 16 (1926-1936)

DP5016
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line (Junction O-16) at Coffeyville
North Endpoint: Junction US 73W in Chanute
Counties Passed through: Montgomery, Neosho, Allen, Anderson, Franklin, Douglas, Jefferson, Atchison, Doniphan

History

The number 16 for this highway appears to be based upon the connecting Oklahoma highway number. State Highway maps from the 1920s era suggest that there were two independent highways with the designation of K-16.[1] An article in the Lawrence Journal-World, however, indicated that highway 16 followed US 73W through Douglas County.[2] Presumably, it followed 73W from Chanute to Nortonville and K-4 from Nortonville to Atchison.

When the state highway system was created, K-16 was hard-surfaced from Cherryvale to Morehead, gravel from Coffeyville to K-96 and from Earlton to Chanute, and graded dirt elsewhere where it was not concurrent with another highway.[1] By 1928, K-16 was hard-surfaced from K-96 to Cherryvale and from Thayer to Earlton, with the remaining graded dirt segments gravelled.[3] By 1932, K-16 was paved from K-96 south to Liberty.[4] By 1933, the segment from Liberty to Coffeyville had been hard-surfaced.[5]

In 1935, US 169 was extended into Kansas, replacing the southern portion of K-16.  At the same time, US 24 was extended into Kansas, requiring a new designation for the existing highway 24. The Highway Commission decided to re-designate the northern segment of K-16 as an extension of K-7, and reassign the number 16 to the former K-24.[6]

History Footnotes

1 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 Jan. 1927

2 "Network of Roads" Lawrence Journal-World 23 Mar. 1928. 1. Accessed 14 Sept. 2013

3 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 Oct. 1928

4 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 Apr. 1932. Accessed 11 Aug. 2013

5 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 June 1933

11 Aug. 2013

6 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, Apr. 1936. Accessed 13 Sept. 2013

Kansas Highway 17 (1926-2013)

D201017
Length: 21 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 54-400 near Midway
North Endpoint: Junction US 81 west of Moundridge (1926-1937); Junction US 81 south of McPherson (1937-1957) Junction K-96 south of Hutchinson (1957-2013)
Counties Passed through: Kingman, Reno, McPherson

History

In 1929, K-17 ended at US 81 in southern McPherson County. By 1932, K-17 was hard surfaced from Hutchinson to Medora., and gravel along the rest of the route.

By 1936, US 81 was realigned, from Moundridge, the former US 81 from K-17 north to the new US 81 near McPherson was re-designated as K-17. K-17 was also hard-surfaced between Medora and the US 81 junction. The remainder of K-17 was hard-surfaced by 1940.

In the late 1950s, a new diagonal between Hutchinson and McPherson was contemplated to connect to the existing K-61 between Pratt and Hutchinson. In February, 1957, the State Highway Commission approved a resolution re-designating K-17 north of Hutchinson as K-61 to establish route continuity along the Pratt to McPherson corridor.

As part of a deal to widen the K-61 diagonal to four lanes, Reno County agreed to take over K-14 between Arlington and Sterling. The new K-61 was completed in 2012. To avoid excessive route number duplication, in 2013, the Secretary of Transportation elected to re-designate K-17 as K-14 as part of changing the alignment of K-14 around the segment that was turned back.

Kansas Highway 18

A18
Length: 232 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 24 north of Bogue
East Endpoint: Junction K-99 east of Waubunsee
Counties Passed through: Graham, Rooks, Osborne, Russell, Lincoln, Ottawa, Dickinson, Geary, Riley, Wabaunsee
K-18 Begins at US 24 near Bogue and ventures southeast, intersecting US 183 at Plainville, and following US 281 for 9 miles near Waldo.  18 plows east to US 81 south of Minneapolis, interchanging with 81 and contiuing east.  K-15 follows 18 for three miles east for 4 miles before 18 enters Junction City and encounters US 77, I-70, and US 40.  From I-70, 18 veers northeast to Manhattan, then ventures east before ending at K-99

History

In 1929, K-18 ended at K-15, and was gravel between Vesper and Bennington, and dirt along the reat of the route. In 1932, K-18 was gravelled between Vesper and Waldo and hard-surfaced west out of Bennington. By the end of 1935, it was gravelled east out of Plainville and hard-surfaced between Bennington and Vesper. By the end of 1936, 18 had been gravelled from Bennington east to the Saline/Ottawa County line and from Waldo west to Paradise, and hard-surfaced from Vesper west to Sylvan Grove. In addition, K-18 was extended along a new gravel alignment from K-15 east to Junction City. By 1940, K-18 was sealed from Bennington west to Natoma, and was gravelled from Plainville west to Damar. By 1941, K-18 had been hard-surfaced from K-15 to Junction City, and gravelled along the rest of the route.

By 1950, K-18 had been hard-surfaced from K-15 to Bennington. By 1953, K-18 had been extended east from Junction City to K-13 as part of a "straight shot" between Junction City and Topeka, and the remainder of K-18 had been hard-surfaced. By 1956, the "straight shot" had been completed and re-designated as US 40, and the original US 40 beteen Junction City and Manhattan was re-designated as K-18. By 1960, 18 was extended east, replacing K-29.

By 1962, K-18 had been four laned from Manhattan to Ogden. By 1977, a new alignment had been built between Odgen and I-70, bypassing the original US 40 through Fort Riley.

Kansas Highway 19

A19
Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 50 near Belpre
Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 281 east of Seward
Counties Passed through: Edwards, Pawnee, Stafford

K-19 begins at US 50 at Belpre in Edwards county, darts north 15 miles to Larned, where there is a spur to US 56, then swings straight east to US 281.

History

K-19 initially existed from Belpre to Larned as a dirt road when initially designated, along with the rest of the state highway system, in 1927.1 By the following year, it had been upgraded to gravel.2 By 1932, K-37 east of Larned had been re-designated as K-19.3 The stretch east of Larned was gravel by 1933.4

By 1936, the Belpre-Larned segment had been hard surfaced.5 In 1946, work began on a hard-surfacing and re-aligning K-19 east of Larned. The new road would go one mile to the south of the towns of Radium and Seward.6

1 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 Jan. 1927.

2 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 Oct. 1928.

3 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 Apr. 1932. Accessed 11 Aug. 2013

4 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 June 1933. Accessed 11 Aug. 2013

5 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, Apr. 1936. Accessed 13 Sept. 2013

6 Kansas State Highway Commission. Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Stafford County, Project 19-93-F 583 (2) 25 Sept. 1946. Accessed 1 Feb. 2014

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

30816
Here is the south end of the K-19 Spur at K-19 south of Larned. 14 July 2007

Spur Kansas Highway 19

A19
South Endpoint: Junction K-19 south of Larned
North Endpoint: Junction US 56 in Larned
Counties Passed through: Pawnee

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

30816
Here is the south end of the K-19 Spur at K-19 south of Larned. 14 July 2007

30817
A bridge plate for the K-19 Spur bridge over the Arkansas River south of Larned . 14 July 2007

30818
The north end of the K-19 Spur at US 56 just outside of the former Santa Fe depot in Larned. 14 July 2007

Kansas Highway 20

A20
West Endpoint: Junction US 75 near the Kickapoo Reservation
East Endpoint: Junction K-7 east of Bendena
Counties Passed through: Brown, Doniphan
K-20 begins at US 75 in southern Brown county and darts 7 miles east across the glacier hills of Northeast Kansas to US 73-159 at Horton. K-20 follows 73 east for 5 miles to Everest, then contines east into Doniphan County, then turns north, then east again, ending at K-7

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

37227
The East end of K-20 at K-7 in Southern Doniphan County.

Kansas Highway 21 (1926-1941)

DP5021
South Endpoint: Oklahom State Line south of Englewood
North Endpoint: Junction US 36 at Norton
Counties Passed through: Clark, Ford, Hodgeman, Lane, Trego, Graham, Norton

History

K-21 was the original designation for what is now US 283. Initially, K-21 had its north end at US 36 in Norton.

US 283 was designated from the Oklahoma line north to US 160 near Englewood, and K-21 was hard surfaced from Minneola to Dodge City, and the remainder of the route was dirt. By 1933, US 283 had been extended north to Dodge City. By 1936, K-21 was gravel from Dodge City north to the Ness/Trego county line and from WaKeeney to Hill City, and had been extended north from US 36 north to the Nebraska line. By 1938, 21 had been graveled from Hill City to the junction with K-9, and had been re-designated US 283 from Dodge City to Norton.

When the remainder of K-21 had been re-designated as US 283 in 1941, 283 had been hard-surfaced from the Oklahoma line to the junction with K-4 in Ness County, and from WaKeeney to Norton.

Kansas Highway 22

A22
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 south of Haddam
North Endpoint: South city limits of Haddam
Counties Passed through: Washington

History

The current incarnation of K-22 was active by 1941.

Kansas Highway 22 (1926-1932)

DP5022
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Liberal
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (Junction N-22 northeast of Woodruff
Counties Passed through: Seward, Haskell, Finney, Scott, Logan, Thomas, Sheridan, Decatur, Norton, Phillips

History

The first incarnation of K-22 was the original designation for the initial alignment of US 83

Kansas Highway 22 (1930-1938)

DP5022
Length: 178.6 miles
South Endpoint: Lawrence Avenue and Douglas Avenue, Wichita
North Endpoint: 6th Avenue and Topeka Avenue, Topeka
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick, Butler, Greenwood, Lyon, Osage, Shawnee

History

When the original K-22 was supplanted by US 83, the highway commission decided to re-use the number to mark a route between Downtown Wichita and Downtown Topeka with a common number. The entire route utilized existing routes: US 81 north to Newton, east on US 50S to Emporia, north on K-11 to Eskridge, then northeast on K-4 into the capital city.[1]

By 1933, K-22's route had changed. The new routing followed US 54 east to K-11 near Eureka, then north on K-11 from US 54 north to US 50N near Admire, then east on US 50N from K-11 east to US 75 near Carbondale; then north along US 75 into Topeka.[2]

When initially signed, the Highway Commission suggested that more such links would be signed with a common number.[1] However, the experiment apparantly turned out to be a failure, and the K-22 designation was taken off of state highway maps in mid-1938.[3]

History Notes

1 "Distinctive Sign, K-22, Now Marks Route between Topeka and Wichita," Topeka Daily Capital 13 Apr. 1930.

2 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 June 1933. Accessed 11 Aug. 2013

3 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, July 1938. Accessed 6 Sept. 2013

Kansas Highway 23

A23
Length: 200 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line (Junction O-23) South of Meade
North Endpoint: Junction US 83 northeast of Selden
Counties Passed through: Meade, Gray, Finney, Lane, Gove, Sheridan, Decatur
K-23 begins at OK 23 in Meade county, twist north 14 miles, darts east 4 miles, then jets north 8 miles to US 54-160 at Meade, then continues for 24 miles to US 56 in central Gray County, then North to US 50 at Cimarron before joining with K-156 in eastern Finney County, follows it west for 6 miles, then darts north through Lane County to K-4 west of the unincorprated town of Shields. 23 follows 4 west for 2 miles before venturing north 34 miles through rural Gove county to I-70 and US 40. 23 follows I-70 east for 3 miles before turning north, crossing US 24 at Hoxie and ending at US 83 near the Sheridan-Dectur County Line.

History

K-23 originally continued north from Dresden, through Oberlin, to the Nebraska Line North of Ceder Bluffs. The Stretch North of Dresden was re-designated as US 183 in 1930.

In the spring of 1938, US 183 was re-aligned south of Oberlin, shifting its south end from Dresden to Selden. In the fall of 1938, US 183 was re-aligned south of Oberlin. As a consequence, the segment between Selden and Oberlin was once again designated as K-23. To accomodate the new alignment, K-23 followed K-9 west to Selden. The segment between K-9 and Oberlin was re-designated as K-123.

In the fall of 1941, the Selden-Oberlin segment was re-designated as US 83

Alternate Kansas Highway 23

A23
Length: 1.83 miles
Southwest Endpoint: Junction Main Street and K-23/Old 40 Road in Grainfield
Northeast Endpoint: Junction K-23 east of Grainfield
Counties Passed through: Gove

Spur Kansas Highway 23

A23
Length: 0.3 miles
South Endpoint: I-70 exit 95
North Endpoint: Junction K-23
Counties Passed through: Gove

US Highway 24

A24
Length: 433.7 miles
West Endpoint: Colorado State Line at Kanorado
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Sherman, Thomas, Sheridan, Graham, Rooks, Osborne, Mitchell, Cloud, Clay, Riley, Pottawatomie, Shawnee, Jefferson, Douglas, Levenworth, Wyandotte

History

Initially, US 24 ended at Independence, Missouri. In 1936, US 24 was extended into Kansas, following US 40 to Lawrence, replaced K-10 from Lawrence to Topeka, followed 40 again to Manhattan, and replaced US 40N through the rest of Kansas and on to Limon, Colo. The stretch of US 24 between Topeka and Manhattan was re-designated solely as US 24 by 1957, when the "straight shot" between Topeka ans Junction City was completed. The straight shot would become part of I-70

Several bypasses have been built along US 24. By 1968, 24 was relocated around Perry and by '69, 24 was rerouted in Graham county so that it became closer to the town of Nicodemus.

In 1999, US 24-40 in Wyandotte County was rebuilt to a five-lane arterial to accompany the new Kansas Speedway and associated development. In 2008, the road was rebuilt from the Speedway west to the K-7 interchange with a wide median. Upon the completion of the project, State Avenue east of K-7 was turned back to the Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City and US 24/40 relocated along I-70. The interchange with K-7 was re-opened January 22, 2009, and reassurance signs started appearing along I-70 in February.

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

36093
Old and new I-70 markers at Milepost 415 in Kansas City. The new markers are to reflect the addition of US 24 and US 40 to the freeway. 12 February 2009

36094
Here's another set of Old and new I-70 markers, this time just east of the Turner Diagonal. US 40 originally joined I-70 at Turner Diagonal, and US 24 joined right before the Lewis and Clark Viaduct. Now, 24-40 joins at Bonner Springs. 12 February 2009

36097
Here, the new westbound I-70/US 24/US 40 reassurance marker is in front of the old one. 12 February 2009

36099
West of I-435, Kansas Turnpike markers are posted along I-70. The new reassurance marker features 24-inch signs for I-70, US 24, and US 40, with space for a new 24-inch Turnpike marker. The old assembly has a 48-inch I-70 marker with a 36-inch KTA shield. 12 February 2009

36103
14 February 2009

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Buisness US Highway 24

A24
Length: 2.903 miles
West Endpoint: I-70/US 24 Exit 17
East Endpoint: I-70/US 24 Exit 19
Counties Passed through: Sherman

Kansas Highway 24 (1926-1936)

DP5024
West Endpoint: Junction K-11 near Blaine
East Endpoint: Junction US 73W north of Oskaloosa
Counties Passed through: Pottawatomie, Jackson, Jefferson

History

K-24 was the initial designation for what is now K-16. K-24 was re-designated as K-16 by 1936, when US 24 was extended into Kansas.

Kansas Highway 25

A25
Length: 237 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line Southwest of Hugoton, contiunes south as OK 136
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (Junction N-25) north of Atwood
Counties Passed through: Stevens, Grant, Kearny, Wichita, Logan, Thomas, Rawlins

Kansas Highway 26

A26
Length: 3.6 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 166-400 south of Galena
North Endpoint: Junction K-66 in Galena
Counties Passed through: Cherokee

History

K-26 appeared on the books by 1941 as a connector between US 69 near Crestline and US 66 near Riverton. The segment between 66 at Galena south to US 166 was added by 1954. The segment between 69 and 66 was re-designated as part of the new US 69A around 1985.

Kansas Highway 26 (1926-1933)

South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line South of South Haven
North Endpoint: Junction US 81 in South Haven
Counties Passed through: Sumner

History

On the 1929 KDOT map, a road extends south from South Haven to the Oklahoma border, connecting with what is labeled as OK 26. Although the highway does not have a clear designation on the map, K-26 would be a logical choice. This route would be re-designated as part of US 177 by 1933.

Kansas Highway 27

A27
Length: 221 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 56 northeast of Elkhart
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line northwest of St. Francis
Counties Passed through: Morton, Stanton, Hamilton, Greeley, Wallace, Sherman, Cheyenne

History

In 2003, KDOT constructed a new bypass on the north side of Elkhart. The bypass was designated as part of K-27 and the old route was turned back to the city and county. While the old road ended at the Kansas-Oklahoma line short of US 56, the bypass ended at 56 east of Elkhart. The Oklahoma highway that connected to K-27 at the state line, OK 95, was truncated back to US 56, creating a discontinuous route connected by US 56.

Kansas Highway 28

A28
Length: 28.9 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-148 east of Jewell
East Endpoint: Junction K-9 west of Concordia
Counties Passed through: Jewell, Cloud

History

K-28 originally continued north along K-14 from Jewell to Mankato, then west along US 36, then north to the Nebraska border. By 1932, the segment between Concordia and Mankato was gravel, and the segment north of US 36 was dirt. The dirt segment was gravelled, and the Concordia-Mankato segment was hard-surfaced, by 1936. The segment between US 36 was hard-surfaced by 1945, and the remainder was hard-surfaced by 1953.

Sometime in 1995, K-28 was trunkated to the junction with K-148 east of Jewell, and the section north of US 36 was redesignated as an extension of K-128

Kansas Highway 29

D5029
West Endpoint: Junction K-13 near Manhattan
East Endpoint: Junction K-11 east of Waubunsee
Counties Passed through: Riley, Wabaunsee

History

K-29 is the original designation for what is now K-18 east of Manhattan. The designation was changed around 1960.

Kansas Highway 30

A30
South Endpoint: I-70 exit 341
North Endpoint: South city limits of Maple Hill
Counties Passed through: Wabaunsee

History

K-30 was created as a spur from K-10 into Maple Hill when K-10 was relocated onto a new alignment south of Maple Hill. It was brought in as a gravel road by 1950, and paved by 1953. The realigned K-10 would eventually become part of I-70

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

43612
Another Candidate for ugly road signs... this sign at the I-70 Maple Hill features taller initial caps in lieu of the standard mixed case. A black border around the K-30 shield is also present here.

Kansas Highway 30 (1926-1932)

DP5030
West Endpoint: Junction K-4 west of Ozawkie
East Endpoint: Junction US 40 in Tonganoxie
Counties Passed through: Jefferson, Leavenworth

History

The original K-30 ran from K-4 to US 73W in Oslokoosa, then east through McLouth to US 40 in Tonganoxie. The pieces east and west of Oskaloosa were replaced by K-92 and the K-24, respectively, by 1932.

Kansas Highway 31

A31
West Endpoint: Junction K-99 south of Eskridge
East Endpoint: Junction US 69 east of Fulton
Counties Passed through: Wabaunsee, Osage, Coffey, Anderson, Linn, Bourbon

History

Initially, K-31 ended in Garnett.  By 1941, 31 followed K-6 to Kincaid, then replaced K-38 to US 69

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

41082

43817
First off, US 169B goes straight as well as to the left. Also, there should be a straight-ahead arrow under the US 59/K-31 assembly. This gaff stems from a temporary closure of US 59, which someone forgot to change back.

43818
This assembly references US 169B and US 59, but someone forgot to include K-31.

43819
The diagramatic sign at the south junction of US 59/K-31 with US 169 has been updated. The new shields have an inset black border.

Kansas Highway 32

A32
West Endpoint: Junction 24-40 east of Lawrence
East Endpoint: Junction US 69 in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Douglas, Leavenworth, Wyandotte

History

In Leavenworth County, K-32 origionally ran slightly to the south, going through Linwood before turning north at Lenape, then back east towards Bonner. The road was realigned (parrallel to the abandoned Kansas City-Kaw Valley interurban line) around 1957.

K-32 orginally followed Park Drive and Central Avenue to 7th Street. This segment was removed from the system, and the former K-132 east of Kaw Drive was re-designated as K-32.

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

36365
On I-635 south of the K-32 interchange, the next three exits are K-32, I-70, and State Avenue. This sign was subsequently replaced as part of the removal of US 24 from State Avenue. 10 March 2009

47314
The west end of the K-32 Truck Route at Front Street and Cedar Street in Bonner Springs. Mainline 32 follows Cedar Street. 31 July 2012

47316
Should you attempt to turn right to head toward Olathe, you'll wind up stuck on the tracks... or in the Kansas River. The ramp from K-32 to southbound K-7 is to the left. 31 July 2012

47317
The west end of the K-32 truck route in Bonner Springs. Even though the truck route is not part of the state system, as part of a project to rebuild the mainline in this area, KDOT gave the truck route "proper" end signage. 31 July 2012

Truck Kansas Highway 32

West Endpoint: Junction K-32 at Kump Avenue/Scheidt Lane intercection.
East Endpoint: Junction K-32 at Ceder Street/Front Street intercetion. Front Street continues east as K-32
Counties Passed through: Wyandotte

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

47314
The west end of the K-32 Truck Route at Front Street and Cedar Street in Bonner Springs. Mainline 32 follows Cedar Street. 31 July 2012

47317
The west end of the K-32 truck route in Bonner Springs. Even though the truck route is not part of the state system, as part of a project to rebuild the mainline in this area, KDOT gave the truck route "proper" end signage. 31 July 2012

Kansas Highway 33

A33
Length: 10.4 miles
South Endpoint: Junction 68 south of Wellsville
North Endpoint: Junction US 56 North of Wellsvile
Counties Passed through: Coffey, Osage, Franklin, Douglas, Johnson

History

Origionally, K-33 met US 50 at Edgerton, came through Ottawa and journeyed southwest through Homewood, Ransomville, Williamsburg, and Silkville before ending at US 75 west of Waverly. The entire route was gravel, except that the route was being hard-surfaced west out of Ottawa, reaching Williamsburg by 1933.

By 1936, K-33 was realgned to meet US 50 in Douglas County north of Wellsville and the segment west of the junction with K-68 into Ottawa was re-designated as an extension of K-68, with the rest of the route (which had been hard-surfaced all the way to Waverl7) re-designated as US 50S.

K-33 was hard-surfaced north of Wellsville by 1940, and hard-surface in its entirty by 1950.

Kansas Highway 34

A34
Length: 29.4 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 160-183 north of Sitka
North Endpoint: Junction US 400 northwest of Bucklin
Counties Passed through: Comanche, Clark, Ford

History

In 1937, the State Highway Commission accepted control of a road in Clark County connecting Oklahoma Highway 34 with US 160, near Sitka and designated it as K-34. In addition, they changed the designation of the road between Protection and Bucklin from K-41 to K-34, while the “old” K-34 in southeast Kansas was re-designated K-37. By 1940, the road between Sitka and the Oklahoma line was designated as US 183. By 1965, a new alignment for K-34 was built between Bucklin and Sitka, bypassing Protection and Comanche County.

Kansas Highway 34 (1926-1937)

West Endpoint: Junction US 75 near Neodeshea
North Endpoint: Junction K-16 south of Thayer
Counties Passed through: Wilson, Montgomery

History

The first K-34 in southeast Kansas was re-designated as a realignment of K-96 west of Neodesha, with the new designation K-37 assigned to the remainder of the route in 1937 to allow the number 34 to be used for a new route in Clark County.

Interstate 35

A35
Length: 235 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line South of South Haven
North Endpoint: Missouri State Line in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Sumner, Sedgwick, Butler, Chase, Lyon, Coffey, Osage, Franklin, Miami, Johnson, Wyandotte

History

I-35 was first envisioned to parallel US 50/50S to Newton, then follow US 81 and US 177 south to the Oklahoma border.  By the time the interstate highway act was passed in 1956, the Kansas Turnpike had completed.  An agreement between the Highway Commission and the the Bureau of Public Roads in December 1956 designated the Turnpike south of Emporia as part of I-35.  The segment between Emporia and Newton was removed, but the segment along US 81 north of Wichita was extended north to Salina as I-35W.

The segment between Olathe and Shawnee was designated in January 1950 as part of US 50 and completed as a two lane roadway by 1953. The bypass around Emporia was designated as part of US 50S in October 1951. In February 1957, two separate resolutions designated I-35 between Ottawa and Olathe (as US 50) and between Shawnee and K-10 at Southwest Boulevard in Kansas City (as US 169). The entire route between Southwest Boulevard and Ottawa was complete as a freeway by 1962.

By 1968, the Emporia bypass, and the segment from Southwest Boulevard to 7th Street, had been completed. In November of 1968, the Highway Commission passed a resolution designating the segment of I-35 between Ottawa and Emporia, along with relocations of US 75 and K-31. The segment between 7th Street and the Missouri border was completed by 1971. I-35 between Ottawa and K-130 north of Neosho Rapids was completed by 1974. The re-located US 75 was completed by 1975. The last segment of I-35 was complete by 1976.

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

31965
A temporary orange diagrammatic sign directs the way to US 50 to Newton, or to the Turnpike and I-35 to Wichita or I-335 to Topeka. The new tollbooths are also in the shot. 10 November 2007

31966
Here's a grab shot of the new Tollboths where I-35 enters the Kansas Turnpike at Emporia 10 November 2007

31967
Her's a shot of the new ramp from I-35 South to I-335 North in Emporia. 10 November 2007

36013
Here's a shot of the bridges for the new Lone Elm Road/I-35 interchange. 24 January 2009

36014
The beams are in place for the Lone Elm road bridge over I-35. 24 January 2009

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Interstate 35W

D6035
West Endpoint: I-35 exit 42 in Wichita
East Endpoint: I-70 exit 250 in Salina
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick, Harvey, McPherson, Saline

History

I-35 was first envisioned to parallel US 50/50S to Newton, then follow US 81 and US 177 south to the Oklahoma border.  By the time the interstate highway act was passed in 1956, the Kansas Turnpike was completed.  An agreement between the Highway Commission and the the Bureu of Public Roads in December 1956 designated the Turnpike as put I-35 along the Turnpike south of Emporia.  The road between Emporia and Newton was removed, but the segment along US 81 north of Wichita was extended north to I-70 at Salina, and was designated I-35W. By 1964, the freeway was complete around Newton.   By 1969, 35W was also completed from Salina south to McPherson. By 1971, it had been extended through Newton I-235 near Wichita. In 1977, I-35W was re-designated as I-135 to comply with AASHTO policy against E/W suffixed interstates. By the time the designation was changed, the only segment not completed was the "Canal Route" through Downtown Wichita.

Kansas Highway 35

D6035
West Endpoint: Junction K-7 west of La Cynge
East Endpoint: Junction US 69 east of La Cynge
Counties Passed through: Linn

History

K-35 was the inital designation for what is now K-152. The designation was changed to K-135 by 1963, when I-35 was assigned, and changed to K-152 by 1978, when I-35W was re-designated as I-135.

US Highway 36

A36
Length: 397 miles
West Endpoint: Colorado State Line west of St. Francis
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line near Elwood
Counties Passed through: Cheyenne, Rawlins, Sheridan, Thomas, Decatur, Norton, Phillips, Smith, Jewell, Republic, Washington, Marshall, Nemaha, Brown, Doniphan

History

The original routing for US 36 took it southwest along K-22 from Norton to US 40N near Halford. The former K-2 west of Norton was re-designated US 36 by 1932

All of US 36 was gravel across the state, with hard-surfaced segments between Montrosa and Courtland, between Marysville and Seneca, east out of Hiawatha, and between Troy and St. Joseph, Mo. in 1932. By 1936, US 36 was hard-surfaced from Norton to Belleville, and from Marysville to Highland. By 1940, the segment between Highland and Troy was hard surfaced. By 1945, US 36 was straigtended between Seneca and Fairview, and part of this new alignment east of Seneca was still gravel. This, along with a segment between Belleview east to Cuba, and from Norton west to the Norton-Decatur county line, were the final segments of gravel on US 36 in Kansas. They were hard-surfaced by 1950.

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

37221
The North end of K-136 at US 36 north of Troy.

44055
The sign for the highway 36 Tradin' Post in Wathena has a very well hand-drawn version of a US 36 cutout shield. 26 June 2012

44056
I also found a old Concrete "Federal Aid Project" Marker along US 36 at St Joseph Street in Wathena 26 June 2012

47067
The southbound advance guide signs on I-135 for K-61 on the south end of McPherson feature the K-61 shield, but not one for US 81B, which has its south end at the K-61 interchange. 20 July 2013

Kansas Highway 37 (1937-1998)

D9237
West Endpoint: Junction US 75 near Neodeshea
East Endpoint: Junction US 169 south of Thayer
Counties Passed through: Wilson, Montgomery

History

K-37 was re-established in southeast Kansas as a re-designation of K-34 in 1937. K-37 was removed from the state highway system and turned back to the counties in 1998, when the new US 400 opened on a new alignment nearby.

Kansas Highway 37 (1926-1936)

DP5037
Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 50S in Kinsley
Northeast Endpoint: Junction K-8 near Seward (1926-1932), Junction US 50N in Larned (1932-1936)
Counties Passed through: Edwards, Anderson, Pawnee, Linn, Stafford, Bourbon

History

The route between US 50N at Larned, and K-8 at Seward was re-designated as an extension of K-19 by 1932. The segment from Seward to Larned became an K-45 by 1936, allowing the number to be used as a re-designation of K-34 in southeast Kansas the following year.

Kansas Highway 38

D9238
Length: 12.8 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-15 north of Dexter
East Endpoint: County road 12.8 miles east of K-15 Junction
Counties Passed through: Cowley, Chautauqua

History

Originally, K-38 was part of a proposed shortcut from Winfield to Independance which was apparantly killed off. The segment that was built was completed by 1945 and paved by 1950. No additional extension of K-38 was completed. Cowley County agreed to take over maintanace of K-38 in the 1990s if KDOT would include a US 77 bypass at Arkansas City in the Comprehensive Transportation Program. K-38 was removed from the state system in November of 1997, when the Arkansas City bypass was completed.

Kansas Highway 38 (1926-1936)

DP5038
West Endpoint: Junction K-6 in Kincaid
East Endpoint: Junction US 73E at Fulton
Counties Passed through:

Kansas Highway 39

A39
West Endpoint: Junction US 400 northwest of Fredonia
East Endpoint: Junction K-7 east of Hiattville
Counties Passed through: Wilson, Neosho, Bourbon

US Highway 40

A40
Length: 427.138 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 40N/US 40S, Manhattan (1926-1935); Colorado State Line west of Weskan
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Wallace, Logan, Gove, Trego, Ellis, Russell, Lincoln, Ellsworth, Saline, Dickinson, Geary, Riley, Pottawatomie, Wabaunsee, Shawnee, Douglas, Leavenworth, Wyandotte

Highway 40 begins at the Colorado border near the town of Weskan, and followed the old Kansas Pacific Mainline, meeting K-27 at Sharon Springs and coinciding with K-25 for 7 miles in Logan County to I-70 and US 83 at Oakley. From Oakley, 40 joins I-70 across Kansas, meeting US 283 at WaKeeney, US 183 at Hays, US 281 at Russell, I-135/US 81 at Salina, US 77 at Junction City, and US 75 at Topeka before turning north off and running parallel to I-70 into Lawrence, meeting US 59 in Lawrence. 40 and 59 turn North in the downtown area, crossing the Kansas River and venturing north to I-70. After intersecting with I-70, 40 and 59 journey north a half mile before meeting with US 24 at what is known locally as Teepee Junction. 40 leaves 59 and Joins 24 east to K-32 before venturing northeast to Tonganoxie, where 24-40 intersects K-16, then turns east toward Kansas City. At the junction with US 73 and K-7 near Bonner Springs, 24-40 follows K-7 south to the junction with I-70, where US 24 and US 40 rejoin I-70 all the way to the state line.

History

The original plan for US 40 through Kansas called for it to be routed on the Victory Highway from Kansas City, through Lawrence and Topeka, to Manhattan, where it followed the Midland Trail to Colby, Goodland, and hitting the Colorado line at Kanornado. The Victory Highway through Abilene, Salina, Ellsworth, Hays, and Oakley would have been US 340. The towns along the Victory Highway protested, claiming that the Midland trail got the nod because it passes through the hometown of Highway Commission Davidson. A meeting was held with the Victory Highway cities on December 18, 1925, leading to a compromise where the Midland Trail became US 40N, while the Victory became US 40S.[1]

A May 1935 article from the Lawrence Journal-World indicated that K-10 would be re-routed on US 40 south of the Kansas River, while US 40 would follow K-10's alignment north of the river, easing congestion in Downtown Lawrence.[2] K-10 was routed onto US 40's alignment, but US 40 was not moved. Instead, US 24 was extended west from Independence, Mo. along US 40, took over K-10's alignment between Lawrence and Topeka. From Topeka to Manhattan, 24 and 40 were co-signed, and at Manhattan, US 24 replaced US 40N, while US 40S was re-designated as US 40.[3]

US 40 between Kansas City and K-7 was considered too dangerous in the 1930's. The State Highway Commission turned the old road (Parallel Parkway) to Kansas City and replaced it with a new four lane facility which, when completed in 1937, was the first stretch of four-lane dual carriageway road in Kansas and the region.[4][5]

In 1938, Wyandotte County experimented with coloured concrete on stretches of US 40 through their county. The test showed that colored concrete was too expensive and the color additive was prone to dissolving concrete.[6] Also, a new underpass was built under the Union Pacific railroad in North Lawrence. The roadbed for the new underpass is actually under the water level of the nearby Kansas River.[7]

The original Victory Highway/US 40S/US 40 ran through Fort Riley, which was somewhat of a problem with the military. On May 25, 1942, the Army closed US 40 through the fort and rerouted traffic around the fort on US 24 and US 77.[8]

In 1957, 40 was routed onto a new straigtshot alignment between Topeka and Junction City, eliminating the Fort Riley problem for US 40 thru traffic. The stretch from Manhattan to Junction City became K-18, and 24 became the sole number for the highway between Manhattan and Topeka. Part of the new route was built under the 1956 Interstate Highway act - the road would be part of Interstate 70.

By 1964, I-70 was completed along a new alignment between Salina and Dorrance, bypassing the town of Ellsworth. 40 was rerouted along the new highway, and the road from Salina to Ellsworth became K-140.

In 1999, US 24-40 in Wyandotte county (which, by then, had lost its median) was rebuilt to a five-lane arterial to accompany the new Kansas Speedway and associated development. In 2008, the road was rebuilt from the Speedway west to the K-7 interchange with a wide median. Upon the completion of the project, State Avenue east of K-7 was turned back to the Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City and US 24/40 relocated along I-70. The interchange with K-7 was re-opened January 22, 2009, and reassurance signs started appearing along I-70 in February.

History Footnotes

1 Sherry Lamb Schirmer and Theodore A. Wilson, Milestones : a history of the Kansas Highway Commission & the Department of Transportation. (Topeka: Kansas Department of Transportation) 2-33.

2 "Bids Thursday on Balance of K-10" Lawrence Journal-World 22 May 1935. 1. Accessed 15 Sept. 2013

3 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, Apr. 1936. Accessed 13 Sept. 2013

4 Schirmer 3-24

5 Kansas State Highway Commission. Resolution for Redesignation of Highways in Wyandotte County 25 Oct. 1937. Accessed 15 Sept. 2013

6 Schirmer 3-23

7 "Underpass Opened to Traffic Today" Lawrence Journal-World 11 June 1938. 1. Accessed 15 Sept. 2013

8 "Detour Around Fort Riley Opens Monday" Topeka Daily Capital 24 May 1942.

Junction Guide

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

36093
Old and new I-70 markers at Milepost 415 in Kansas City. The new markers are to reflect the addition of US 24 and US 40 to the freeway. 12 February 2009

36094
Here's another set of Old and new I-70 markers, this time just east of the Turner Diagonal. US 40 originally joined I-70 at Turner Diagonal, and US 24 joined right before the Lewis and Clark Viaduct. Now, 24-40 joins at Bonner Springs. 12 February 2009

36097
Here, the new westbound I-70/US 24/US 40 reassurance marker is in front of the old one. 12 February 2009

36099
West of I-435, Kansas Turnpike markers are posted along I-70. The new reassurance marker features 24-inch signs for I-70, US 24, and US 40, with space for a new 24-inch Turnpike marker. The old assembly has a 48-inch I-70 marker with a 36-inch KTA shield. 12 February 2009

36103
14 February 2009

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Business US Highway 40 (Trego County)

Length: 2.2 miles
West Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 127
East Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 128
Counties Passed through: Trego

History

The Business Loop was created along US 283 through WaKenney and replaced a US 283 spur in 1984.

Alternate US 40 (1967-1979)

Business US Highway 40 (Russell County)

Length: 6.4 miles
West Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 184
East Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 189
Counties Passed through: Russell

History

Created by 1967, when I-70 and US 40 bypassed Russell. It was rebannered as Business US 40 by 1978

Alternate US 40 (1967-1979)

Business US Highway 40 (Geary County)

Length: 4 miles
West Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 296
East Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 300
Counties Passed through: Sheridan

History

Created by 1967, when I-70 and US 40 bypassed Junction City. It was rebannered as Business US 40 by 1978.

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

47017
The exit sign for I-70 exit 300 (US 40B and K-57) features a small, haphazardly placed "South" marker above the K-57 shield. The south marker was added as part of construction of K-57 north of I-70 and, for whatever reason, was never taken back down. 20 July 2013

Spur US Highway 40

South Endpoint: Kansas Turnpike East Topeka Interchange (Exit 9/183)
North Endpoint: Junction US 40 (6th Ave and Deer Creek Trafficway)
Counties Passed through: Shawnee

History

Originally built as the connection between US 40 (6th Avenue) and the Kansas Turnpike's East Topeka interchange, its fate was intertangled with the construction of I-70. When I-70 was completed in the area, I-70 traffic had to exit from the access road to I-70 and vice versa. The roadway that contained I-70 west of this intersection was slated to be extended east and north to what was then proposed as the Deer Creek expressway. By 1986, I-70 had been realigned to directly tie in with the Toll plaza, making the spur connection unnecessary. The portion of the road north of I-70 was subsequently abandoned.

US Highway 40N (1926-1935)

DP5040
West Endpoint: Colorado State Line near Kanorado
East Endpoint: Junction US 40/US 40S, Manhattan
Counties Passed through: Sherman, Thomas, Sheridan, Graham, Rooks, Osbourn, Mitchell, Cloud, Clay, Riley

History

From the border, 40N travelled along the Midland Trail through Goodland, Colby, Hill City, Osborne, and Clay Center before hooking with US 40S at Manhattan. The Original 1925 plans called for the Midland Trail to be US 40, but the towns along the Victory Highway protested, claiming that the Midland trail got the US 40 designation because it passed through the hometown of the Highway Commissioner. A meeting was held with the Victory Highway cities on December 18, 1925, leading to a compromise where the Victory Highway became US 40S and the Midland Trail became US 40N.

US 40N was re-designated as an extension of US 24 in 1936.

US Highway 40S (1926-1935)

DP5040
West Endpoint: Colorado state line west of Weskan
East Endpoint: Junction US 40/US 40N, Manhattan
Counties Passed through: Wallace, Logan, Gove, Trego, Ellis, Russell, Ellsworth, Saline, Dickinson, Geary, Riley

History

From the border, 40S travelled along the Victory Highway through Oakley, WaKeeny, Hays, Elssworth, Salina, and Abiline before hooking with US 40N at Manhattan. The original planed called for the Victory Highway to be US 340 and the Midland Trail to be US 40. The towns along the Victory Highway protested, claiming that the Midland Trail got the US 40 designation because it passed through the hometown of the Highway Commissioner. A meeting was held with the Victory Highway cities on December 18, 1925, leading to a compromise where the Midland Trail became US 40N, while the Victory became US 40S

US 40S was re-designated as US 40 in 1936 when US 40N was re-designated as an extension of US 24.

Kansas Highway 41

A41
Length: 5 miles
West Endpoint: East City Limits of Delphos
East Endpoint: Junction US 81
Counties Passed through: Ottawa

Kansas Highway 41 (1926-1937)

South Endpoint: Junction K-12 (US 160 after 1932) near Protection
North Endpoint: Junction US 54 in Bucklin (1926-1933) Junction US 154 North of Bucklin (1933-1936)
Counties Passed through: Comanche, Clark, Ford

Kansas Highway 42

A42
Length: 79.9 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 281 in Sawyer
East Endpoint: I-235 exit 5, Wichita
Counties Passed through: Pratt, Kingman, Sumner, Sedgwick

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

Kansas Highway 43

A43
Length: 20.8 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-4 at Hope
North Endpoint: I-70 exit 281
Counties Passed through: Dickinson

Kansas Highway 44

A44
Length: 25 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-2 in Anthony
East Endpoint: Junction K-49 north of Caldwell
Counties Passed through: Harper, Sumner

Kansas Highway 45

Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Morton, Stevens, Haskell, Gray, Ford, Edwards, Pawnee, Barton, Ellsworth

Kansas Highway 46 (1933-2013)

D201046
Length: 1.315 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 56 south of Little River
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Little River
Counties Passed through: Rice

History

The spur connecting US 50N and Little River first appeared on the 1933 State Highway Map. No numerical designation appeared on the map for this short spur; however, the 1940 Rice County Highway Map does show the road as designated K-46.

K-46 was removed from the state highway system and turned over to Rice County on June 3, 2013.

Kansas Highway 47

A47
Length: 61 miles
West Endpoint: East City Limits of Fredonia
East Endpoint: Junction US 69 near Franklin
Counties Passed through: Wilson, Neosho, Crawford

Kansas Highway 48 (1939-1984)

Length: 0.775 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Atchison
North Endpoint: Kansas State Orphans Home
Counties Passed through: Atchison

History

This roadway was designated by a state resolution in 1939, from what was then the intersection of North 3rd and "P" Street, then north along Third, cutting diagonally to Second, then turning east on what is today designated 298th Street in Atchison County, then east 876 feet, then north 455 feet, to the main Administration building of the Kansas Orphans Home.

This highway was never shown on state-level maps, but was shown on the Atchison County maps through 1978. The next published county map was in 1984, which is where I'm currently establishing as the date this road was removed from the State Highway System

Incidentally, since this highway never connected to any other state highway, the second K-48 was an orphan in and of itself.

Kansas Highway 48 (1927-1937)

West Endpoint: Junction K-7 in Mound City
East Endpoint: Junction US 73E south of Pleasanton
Counties Passed through: Linn

History

The first K-46 was re-designated as K-52 in 1937.

Kansas Highway 49

A49
South Endpoint: Junction US 81 in Caldwell
North Endpoint: Junction K-42 near Viola
Counties Passed through: Sumner, Sedgwick

US Highway 50

A50
Length: 447.79 miles
West Endpoint: Colorado State Line west of Coolidge
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line in Leawood
Counties Passed through: Hamilton, Kearney, Finney, Gray, Ford, Edwards, Stafford, Reno, Harvey, Marion, Chase, Lyon, Coffey, Osage, Franklin, Douglas, Miami, Johnson

History

Across Kansas, 50 was a split route between Garden City and Baldwin Junction in Douglas County. See the history of US 50N and US 50S for an overview of the history of the individual segments of the split routes.

Outside the splits, by 1932, US 50 was gravel between Syracuse and Kendall, and between Baldwin and Gardner, with the remainder hard-surfaced. The rest of US 50 in Johnson County was hard surfaced by 1933, and in Hamilton and Douglas Counties by 1936.

By 1955, The US 50 N/S split was eliminated with the introduction of US 56 and 156. As a consequence, the Baldwin Junction-Kansas City segment of US 50 was re-desinated as US 50/56. By 1962, I-35 had been completed between Kansas City and Ottawa, and US 50's designation was moved to the new highway, re-designating the old US50S between Ottawa and Baldwin Junction solely as US 59, and the old US 50 east of Baldwin Junction solely as US 56. US 50 no longer went through Douglas County, but cut across the northwest corner of Miami County.

I-35 re-joined the old US 50 alignment at Olathe, and was built on top of it from Olathe to the Shawnee Mission Parkway. US 50 (and US 56) followed the Shawnee Mission Parkway east to the Missouri State Line. By 1984, US 50 was moved from the Shawnee Mission Parkway to I-435.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

37042
An oversized reassurance marker for I-435, US 50, and US 169 between the Antioch and Metcalf interchange. It is interesting that the elected to add a US 169 marker here, as the plan called for US 169 to be re-designated onto I-35 and the Shawnee Mission Parkway.

39453

39452
"New Old School?" Apparently, when the contractor installed this new assembly on I-35/US 50 where US 59 now joins, they used what the road enthusiast community refers to as the "1958 specs," which carry smaller digits on the I-35 shield.

39455

43803
The guide marker on I-435 approaching the I-35 interchange still mentions K-10, US 50, and US 56, but US 169 has now been removed from the assembly. 26 May 2012

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US Highway 50N (1926-1956)

D5050
West Endpoint: Junction US 50/US 50S/US 83 in Garden City
East Endpoint: Junction US 50/US 50S/US 59 west of Baldwin City
Counties Passed through: Finney, Hodgeman, Pawnee, Barton, Rice, McPherson, Marion, Dickinson, Morris, Lyon, Osage, Douglas

History

US 50N started at Garden City and proceeded east to Larned, and through McPherson, Herrington, Osage City, Burlingame, and Overbrook before rejoining with US 50S at Baldwin Junction.

By 1932, 50N remained dirt from east of Garden City to west of Jetmore, from Council Grove to the Morris-Lyon County Line, and from Overbrook to Baldwin Junction. 50N was hard surfaced from Ellinwood to Silica, from Wisdom to Herrington, from Allen to Admire, and from Osage City to US 75. By 1933, 50N was gravelled in Finney and Morris Counties, and hard surfaced between Great Bend and Lyons and between Allen and Overbrook. By 1936, the remaining dirt segment in Hodgeman County had been gravelled, a segment northeast out of Larned hard-surfaced, and hard surfaced in its entirety east of Great Bend. All of US 50N was hard surfaced by 1941.

In the early 1950s, a push was made to create a new US 55 between Springer, New Mexico and Kansas via what was then K-45. There were various suggestions on the alignment. The first suggestion would have followed K-45 all the way to Ellsworth, then followed US 40 and K-4 via Topeka and Atchison. This was rejected by AASHO due to the excessive use of overlapping routes. A revised route, submitted in March 1955, routed the proposed route via Lincoln Center and Mahanttan, replacing various state numbered highways. The final proposal, submitted in June 1956, had the new route following US 50N east from Larned to Kansas City, with a spur US route designation between Larned and Garden City. The June 1956 proposal was adopted by AASHTO, but since the roadway was predominantly east-west, they adopted an even number, US 56.

Upon approval of the new US 56 designation, US 50N was re-designated as US 156 from Garden City to Larned, and as US 56 from Larned to Kansas City.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

US Highway 50S (1926-1956)

D5050
West Endpoint: Junction US 50/US 50N/US 83 in Garden City
East Endpoint: Junction US 50/US 50N/US 59 west of Baldwin City
Counties Passed through: Finney, Gray, Ford, Edwards, Stafford, Reno, Harvey, Marion, Chase, Lyon, Coffey, Osage, Franklin, Douglas

History

US 50S ran from Garden City through Dodge City, Hutchinson, and Newton before arriving at Emporia and then to Ottawa, where it travelled north on US 59 to meet with US 50N at Baldwin Junction.

By 1932, US 50S was already hard-surfaced for a significant distance, with the only segments not hard surfaced being betweeen northeast of Newton to Cottonwood Falls, and between the Lyon/Coffey County Line and Ottawa. Also, at the junction with US 75, 50S followed US 75 to just south of Lyndon, then headed east through Quenemo and Pomona to Ottawa.

By October, 1935, a new hard-surfaced alignment was built between Strong City and Elmdale, bypassing Cottonwood Falls.

By 1936, 50S was re-aligned on the hard-surfaced K-33 in Franklin and Coffey Counties, with the old 50S alignment re-deignated K-68. 50S was also hard-surfaced between Florence and US 75.

In a resolution dated December, 1939, the south junction of US 50S and US 59 was re-aligned, eliminiating a railroad grade crossing on the south side of Ottawa.

US 50S was hard-surfaced in its entirety by 1941.

In a resolution dated June of 1946, US 50S was designated on a new alignment 1/2 mile to the north for 4 miles to the west. A December 1948 resolution did the same for 6 miles to the east of Emporia, and a September 1950 resolution extended the eastern realignment for another 4 miles to the Coffey County line. These relocations were completed by 1953.

The US 50 N/S split was eliminated with AASHO's June 1956 approval of US 56 and 156. As part of the approved new highway designation, US 50S was re-designated as US 50.

A bypass to the North of Emporia had been shown as proposed as far back as the June 1946 resolution. In October 1950, a resolution offically designated the proposed bypass as part of US 50S. The bypass would be eventually be completed and designated a href="highways.php?hwy1=35&seg=1">I-35.

Business US Highway 50 (Finney County)

Northwest Endpoint: Junction US 50/83/400 northwest of Garden City, continues north as US 83
Southeast Endpoint: Junction US 50/83/400 on Fulton Street in Garden City, continues east as US 50-400
Counties Passed through: Finney

History

In a December, 1980 resolution, US 50 and US 83 were realigned onto a new bypass around the east and north sides of Garden City. The old 50 was designated as a Buisness Route east of the former US 83, then extended north along the old 83 back to the bypass.

Business US Highway 50 (Ford County, 1981-2009)

Length: 7.89 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 50 west of Dodge City
East Endpoint: Junction US 50/56/283 northeast of Dodge City
Counties Passed through: Ford

History

In November, 1980, AASHTO passed a resolution redesignating what was US 50A as mainline US 50, with the existing US 50 designated as a US 50B. A resolution confirming the re-designation was issued by KDOT in April, 1981.

As part of getting a new US 400 bypass built on the southwest side of Dodge City, the city agreed to take full maintenance of Wyatt Earp Boulevard. This was approved via a highway resoulution in April, 2008, effective upon the completion of the new US 400. The new bypass was completed in October of 2009.

US 50 Spur (Franklin County, 1962-1979)

Business US Highway 50 (Franklin County, 1979-2001)

Southwest Endpoint: I-35/US 50 exit 182
Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 59 in Ottawa (1962-1979); I-35/US 50 exit 187 (concurrent with K-68) (1979-2001)
Counties Passed through: Franklin

History

In 1957, the State Highway Commission passed a resolution adding the future I-35 to the state highway system. The interstate projects were let as an extension of US 50. By 1962, I-35 had been completed between Olathe and Ottawa and the US 50 designation was shifted to the new interstate. The existing US 50 was retained, with the segment between the end of the I-35 project and US 59 in Ottawa designated as a spur of US 50.

In October, 1979, AASHTO passed a resolution redesignating the spur as a Buisness loop. KDOT issued a resolution in 1981 confirming the redesignation, and extending the Buisnes loop to reconnect with I-35 via US 59 and K-68

In November, 2000, a state resolution was passed removing US 50B from the State Highway System upon the conclusion of a project to rebuild the I-35 roadbed in Franklin County. As part of the rebuilding, the bridge over I-35 on old US 50 was demolished and not replaced. The bridge taking old US 50 over southbound US 59 and a former Santa Fe railroad line was also demolished. The roadway leading up to these bridges was abandoned, with the remainder reverting to the city of Ottawa.

Alternate US Highway 50 (1955-1981)

West Endpoint: Junction US 50 west of Dodge City
East Endpoint: Junction US 50/56/283 northeast of Dodge City
Counties Passed through: Ford

History

In late 1948, A new eastern bypass for US 50S and US 283 was laid out, cutting diagonally to the southwest from the existing alignment 4 miles east of Dodge City, then turning west to what was then known as Chestnut Street. By 1952, this new corridor was completed, but a new northern bypass, continuing the old US 50S west from where it originally turned south north of Dodge, then proceeding southwest to meet US 50 west of town, was designated. By 1955, the northern bypass was completed, and was assigned the designation US 50 Alternate

In November 1980, AASHTO passed a resolution redesignating the northern bypass as US 50, and the eastern bypass and city street alignment as US 50B. A resolution confirming the redesignation was issued in April of 1981.

Spur US Highway 50 (Finney County, 1953-1971)

West Endpoint: Junction US 50S/US 50, present-day Campus Drive and Fulton Street, Garden City
East Endpoint: Junction US 50N/US 156, Present-day Campus Drive and Kansas Avenue, Garden City
Counties Passed through: Finney

History

In a resolution passed in December of 1952, the State Highway Commision established a new spur route of US 50S to connect with US 50N east of Garden City.

By 1970, the Garden City city limits had extended out to the US 50 spur, and plans were underway for a new bypass around Garden City to the east and north. A May, 1970 resolution designated this new bypass as a spur of US 83. The new route intersected US 50 and US 156 1/2 mile east of the existing spur route. While the resolution did not specifically remove the US 50 spur, it is probably safe to say that it was withdrawn as a state highway when the parallel segment of the Garden City bypass was opened to traffic.

Kansas Highway 51

A51
Length: 97.7 miles
West Endpoint: Colorado State Line northwest of Elkhart
East Endpoint: Junction US 160 north of Liberal
Counties Passed through: Morton, Stevens, Seward

Kansas Highway 52

A52
Length: 22.4 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-31 southwest of Mound City
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line west of Butler, MO
Counties Passed through: Anderson, Lynn

Kansas Highway 52 (1926-1931)

Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Scott, Lane, Ness, Rush

Kansas Highway 53

Length: 6.1 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 81 west of Mulvane
East Endpoint: Junction K-15 in Mulvane
Counties Passed through: Sumner

US Highway 54

Length: 380.2 miles
West Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line southwest of Liberal
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line east of Fort Scott
Counties Passed through: Seward, Meade, Clark, Ford, Kiowa, Pratt, Kingman, Sedgwick, Butler, Greenwood, Woodson, Allen, Bourbon

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

43920
The North end of K-105 at US 54 north of Toronto 4 June 2012

43923
This Bridge takes the BNSF Emporia Sub over US 54/77 on the south end of El Dorado. Watch your head. 4 June 2012

47187
The guide sign for the Intrust Bank arena on Northbound I-135 directs traffic onto westbound Kellogg. The US 54 and US 400 shields on this sign has a inset border. 20 July 2012

47191
The advance guide sign for the interchange between I-135 and Kellogg (US 54-400) is a two-lane exit with an optional lane. On the reassurance assembly, US 81 and K-15 are both posted. On the exit guide sign, Kellogg Avenue is posted as 'Just Plain Kellogg.' 20 July 2013

47231
The exit guide sign for the K-96 exit with I-35 and 127th Street East (That is the full name of the road). The advance guide signs for the southeast end of the freeway at US 54-400 are a bit cramped... These signs pre-date the addition of US 400. 20 July 2013

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Kansas Highway 55

A55
Length: 12 miles
Endpoint: Junction US 81 west of Belle Plaine
East Endpoint: Junction K-15 in Udall
Counties Passed through: Sumner, Cowley

US Highway 56

A56
Length: 471.45 miles
West Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line at Elkhart
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line in Mission Hills
Counties Passed through: Morton, Stevens, Haskell, Gray, Ford, Edwards, Pawnee, Barton, Rice, McPherson, Marion, Dickinson, Morris, Lyon, Osage, Douglas, Johnson

History

In the early 1950s, a push was made to create a new US 55 between Springer, New Mexico and Kansas via what was then K-45. There were various suggestions on the alignment. The first suggestion would have followed K-45 all the way to Ellsworth, then followed US 40 and K-4 via Topeka and Atchison. This was rejected by AASHO due to the excessive use of overlapping routes. A revised route, submitted in March 1955, routed the proposed route via Lincoln Center and Mahanttan, replacing various state numbered highways. The final proposal, submitted in June 1956, had the new route following K-45 west of Larned, then turning east on US 50N to Kansas City, with a spur US route designation on the old US 50N between Larned and Garden City. The June 1956 proposal was adopted by AASHTO, but since the roadway was predominantly east-west, they adopted an even number, turning the proposed US 55 into US 56.

In an April, 1985 resolution, US 56 was routed to meet I-35 at Gardner, turning back much of the old roadway between Gardner and Olathe.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

39473
The Bridge Piers are in place for the US 59 bridge over US 56 at Baldwin Junction

40514
Here's a shot looking west of the new US 59 overpass over US 56 at Baldwin Junction.

41866
Here's a shot of the new US 59 bridges over US 56 at Baldwin Junction

43803
The guide marker on I-435 approaching the I-35 interchange still mentions K-10, US 50, and US 56, but US 169 has now been removed from the assembly. 26 May 2012

44424
At the approach to the loop ramp from Southbound Metcalf to Eastbound Shawnee Mission Parkway, a new post and guide marker have been installed for US 169. 14 July 2012

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Buisness US Highway 56

Length: 2.7 miles
Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 56-77 south of Herington
Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 56-77 east of Herington
Counties Passed through: Dickinson

History

US 56B was caused by the rerouting of US 56 to the east side of Herington. This segment had been multiplexed with US 77B, and was therefore deemed duplicative. Since 56 was the lower number, it was the one kept.

Kansas Highway 56 (1926-1936)

West Endpoint: Junction US 73E near Trading Post
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line west of Butler, MO
Counties Passed through: Lynn

History

The first K-56 was re-designated as K-52 in 1936.

Kansas Highway 56 (1937-1954)

West Endpoint: Junction K-23 west of Fowler
East Endpoint: Junction US 54 south of Fowler
Counties Passed through: Meade

History

The Second K-56 was created along a new alignment by 1937. It was gravel at the outset, and was not paved until 1957. At the same time the road was hard-surfaced, K-56 was re-designated as an extension of K-98 to allow the 56 number for the new US route.

Kansas Highway 57

A57
Length: 31.2 miles
Northwest Endpoint: Milford Lake State Park
Southeast Endpoint: Junction K-4 at Dwight
Counties Passed through: Geary, Morris, Chase, Lyon, Greenwood, Coffey, Anderson, Allen, Neosho, Crawford

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

47017
The exit sign for I-70 exit 300 (US 40B and K-57) features a small, haphazardly placed "South" marker above the K-57 shield. The south marker was added as part of construction of K-57 north of I-70 and, for whatever reason, was never taken back down. 20 July 2013

Kansas Highway 58

A58
Length: 46.76 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-99 at Madison
East Endpoint: Junction US 169 west of Colony
Counties Passed through: Greenwood, Coffey, Anderson

Kansas Highway 58 ()

Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 50 northeast of Old Town Lenexa at 87th Street
Northeast Endpoint: Junction K-5 at 18th Street and Quindaro in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Johnson, Wyandotte

US Highway 59

A59
Length: 208.39 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line South of Chatopa
North Endpoint: Missouri State Line at Atchison
Counties Passed through: Labette, Neosho, Allen, Anderson, Franklin, Douglas, Jefferson, Atchison

History

US 59 was in place by 1934, replacing the US 73 and US 73W designations from the Oklahoma Line to Nortonville, and replacing the K-4 designation from Nortonville to the Missouri line at Atchison. US 59 was also concurrent with US 169 between Garnett and Earlton. By 1936, US 59 was hard-surfaced in most places, with only the portion between the Oklahoma line and Oswego, as well as between Welda and Garnett being the only segments that remained gravel. The Welda-Garnett segment was hard-surfaced by 1940, with the segment south of Oswego hard-surfaced by 1941.

By 1950, US 59 had been re-aligned in Neosho County. Instead of turning east at Earlton, 59 turned east at Chanute, being co-designated along K-39 to the junction with K-6, then following K-6 south to Erie. By 1962, 59 had been re-aligned once again, following K-31 from Garnett to Kincaid and following K-6 from Kincaid to Erie. As a result, K-6 was re-designated as US 59.

Meanwhile, in Atchison County, the "stairstep" alignment between Nortonville and Atchison was gradually straightened. The first segment was completed by 1950; the second segment, taking the roadway to Cummings, was completed by 1957; and the final segment between Cummings and Nortonville was completed by 1962.

In Douglas County, 73W/59 originally turned east at what is now 23rd Street, then followed Massachusetts Street through downtown to the Kansas River. By 1956, the present-day Iowa Street was built, and the US 59 designation was moved from 23rd Street and Massachusetts to Iowa Street. At about the same time, US 40 was moved from 7th Street to 6th Street, which also included the US 59 designation. In 1973, US 59 south of Lawrence was widened to four lanes for about 3 miles south of Lawrence, with a new alignment for another 2 miles south that could be expanded to 4 lanes. At the time, it was foreseen that US 59 would eventually be upgraded to a full freeway between Lawrence and Ottawa.

Plans to widen US 59 between Lawrence and Ottawa began in earnest in the Early 2000s, by which time the segment of 59 had a significantly higher accident rate than other 2 lane roadways in the state. A draft Environmental Impact Statement, with two alternatives, one parallel to the current 59, and one a mile east, was released in April 2002. There was significant opposition to the freeway proposal, and particularly to the "mile east" option. In the Final EIS, released in May 2003, the parallel option was selected. Ground was broken on the new 59 project on the Franklin County side in June 2007. The new freeway opened in two sections. The Franklin County segment opened March 30, 2010. The Douglas County segment opened October 18, 2012.

Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

31637
Here's a shot of the fill for elevating the new US 59 freeway over the Midland Railway in northern Franklin County 16 October 2007

31638
Here's a closeup of the new US 59 over the Midland Railway in Franklin County. 16 October 2007

31639
Here's a shot from a different angle of construction of the bridge taking US 59 over the Midland Railway. 10 October 2007

36402
Here we have the grading for the interim connection between the old 2-lane and the new freeway on US 59 in Franklin County. 14 March 2009

36402
At the junction with Stratford Road, the old two lane has been shifted to the west slightly to allow for an interchange on the new US 59 freeway. 14 March 2009

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Kansas Highway 60

Length: 4.3 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 southeast of Almena
North Endpoint: Junction K-383 near Almena
Counties Passed through: Norton

Kansas Highway 61

A61
Length: 82.6 miles
Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 54-400 east of Pratt
Northeast Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 58, McPherson
Counties Passed through: Pratt, Reno, McPherson

Kansas Highway 62

A62
Length: 13.2 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-16 south of Soldier
North Endpoint: Junction K-9near Goff
Counties Passed through: Jackson, Nemaha

Kansas Highway 63

A63
Length: 58.7 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 24 in St. Marys
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line south of Dubois, NE
Counties Passed through: Pottawatomie, Nemaha

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

44096
A bit of pre-July 4 patriotic display in a work zone on K-63/K-16 in Pottawatomie County.

Kansas Highway 64

Length: 3.6 miles
Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 281 south of Pratt
Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 54-400 east of Pratt
Counties Passed through: Pratt

Kansas Highway 65

Length: 11.2 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-3 west of Xenia
East Endpoint: Junction K-31 in Mapleton
Counties Passed through: Bourbon

Kansas Highway 65 (1926-1934)

South Endpoint: Junction US 36 south of Lebanon
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line south of Red Cloud, NE
Counties Passed through: Smith

US Highway 66 (1926-1985)

Kansas Highway 66 (1985-)

A66
Length: 9 miles
West Endpoint: Oklahoma State line, Baxter Springs (1926-1985); Junction US 69A-400 west of Riverton (1985-)
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line east of Galena
Counties Passed through: Cherokee

Kansas Highway 67

Length: 1 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 east of Norton
North Endpoint: County road 1 mile north of US 36 Junction
Counties Passed through: Norton

Kansas Highway 68

A68
Length: 59.6 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 75/K-31 south of Lyndon
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line east of Louisburg
Counties Passed through: Osage, Franklin, Miami

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

39454
A new BGS on US 59 just northeast of the south junction with US 59 now includes the advance distance to the new US 59 north exit, as well as the 15th Street and K-68 exits.

40731
The goof regarding junction sign for US 59 on K-68 in Ottawa is the fact that the sign should have been removed when US 59 was relocated from Main Street to the new freeway. The road work sign is for a mill/overlay of Main Street.

46560
The sign gantry on southbound I-35 at the north junction with US 59. The next exit (K-68) is mentioned, as is the fact that US 59 is "dual" with I-35, but nowhere is there a mention of US 50. 20 April 2013

US Highway 69

A69
Length: 160 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Columbus
North Endpoint: Missouri State Line on the Fairfax Bridge in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Cherokee, Crawford, Bourbon, Linn, Miami, Johnson, Wyandotte

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

32242
The new overhead signs on I-435 at the US 69 interchange indicate two things: that the off-ramp from eastbound 435 to Antioch is immediately after the off-ramp for US 69, and that the last reference to US 169 on the guide signs for the Metcalf interchange has been removed.

32531
Here's a shot of the new ramp from southbound US 69 to I-435. It ramps upward towards a flyover. Note the sign for westbound 435 is exposed. 12 January 2008

34515
Here's the new exit for US 69 onto 435 and 103rd Street. At the time this pic was taken, southbound 69 was temporarily shut down 20 September 2008

35926
Here's the point where you need your final answer as to whether or not to exit onto US 69 or join I-435. 31 December 2008

36112
At the end of the Kansas Turnpike, the old I-70 marker with US 40 and US 69 is in front of the replacement marker which includes the addition of US 24 to this strethc of freeway. 14 February 2009

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Alternate US Highway 69

Length: 15 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line, of Baxter Springs
North Endpoint: Junction US 69-160-400 north of Crestline
Counties Passed through: Cherokee

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

45829
The state of Oklahoma is recommending that most trucks utilize US 69A, rather then US 69, into Kansas. On the other hand, there is a 13 foot, 8 inch "Truck Guillotine," that might make most trucks want to avoid both highways and take US 59 or I-44 instead. 13 December 2012

45830
Here's the warning of the 13-8 Low Clearance underpass on US 69A. 13 December 2012

45832
The south end of US 69A at US 69. 13 December 2012

45834
This railroad bridge over US 69A south of Quapaw is the major "Truck Guillotine" that restricts trucks from using this route. The clearance is listed as 13 feet, 8 inches. 13 December 2012

45839
The first US 69A marker in Kansas at Baxter Springs. 13 December 2012

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Business US Highway 69 (Pittsburg)

Length: 4.1 miles
Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Crawford

Business US Highway 69 (Arma)

Length: 2 miles
Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Crawford

Business US Highway 69 (Fort Scott)

Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Bourbon

Interstate 70

A70
Length: 423.753 miles
West Endpoint: Colorado State Line near Kanorado
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line on the Lewis and Clark Viaduct in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Sherman, Thomas, Logan, Gove, Trego, Ellis, Russell, Lincoln, Ellsworth, Saline, Dickinson, Geary, Riley, Wabaunsee, Shawnee, Douglas, Leavenworth, Wyandotte

History

The first segment of what would become I-70 (excluding the turnpike) was opened on November 14, 1956 — the first project completed under the 1956 Federal Highway Act — for about 8 miles west of Topeka. This segment was completed as a two-lane project — the other carriageway would be built later. By 1963, the freeway was open from the Polk-Quincy Viaduct in Downtown Topeka to US 81 in Salina as well as between Ogallah and Grainfield. The Segment between Salina and Wilson was completed in 1964, bypassing Ellsworth. K-140 was created to connect Salina to Ellsworth on old US 40. The segment between Levant and Ogallah was opened to traffic in 1965, with the stretch between Grainfield and Wilson opened to traffic in November of 1966 . The final stretch of I-70 in Kansas, near Goodland, was opened to traffic in August of 1970 (Schirmer 5-10).

I-70 was initially connected to the Kansas Turnpike via a partial interchange with the original US 40 Spur. The original plans called for the interchange to eventually be expanded to a full cloverleaf, and that the freeway would continue east and north as the Deer Creek Expressway. Despite the fact that the Deer Creek expressway had been languishing for many years, the partial interchange configuration remained until at least 1977. By the early 90s, the US 40 spur was abandoned, and I-70 would be realigned to remove the partial interchange completely. In the 1990's, the Deer Creek expressway would be renamed the Oakland Expressway, designated as K-4, and selected as a KDOT system enhancement project. The Oakland project, combined with the fact that the East Topeka interchange was overburdened, led to a project to rebuild the East Topeka interchange. Construction of the new interchange, with new flyover connections between I-70, the Turnpike, and the Oakland Expressway, was built between 1999 and 2001.

The Kansas Turnpike between East Topeka and K-10 at Lecompton was widened from 4 to six lanes between 2004 and 2006. The bridges over the Kansas River at Lawrence, along with adjacent bridges, were replaced between 2009 and 2011. The new Westbound bridge over the Kansas River was completed in November 2009, and initially carried both directions of traffic. During late 2009 and early 2010, the original bridges over the river were demolished. The new eastbound bridge was completed in late 2010.

Junction Guide

Photos

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36093
Old and new I-70 markers at Milepost 415 in Kansas City. The new markers are to reflect the addition of US 24 and US 40 to the freeway. 12 February 2009

36094
Here's another set of Old and new I-70 markers, this time just east of the Turner Diagonal. US 40 originally joined I-70 at Turner Diagonal, and US 24 joined right before the Lewis and Clark Viaduct. Now, 24-40 joins at Bonner Springs. 12 February 2009

36097
Here, the new westbound I-70/US 24/US 40 reassurance marker is in front of the old one. 12 February 2009

36099
West of I-435, Kansas Turnpike markers are posted along I-70. The new reassurance marker features 24-inch signs for I-70, US 24, and US 40, with space for a new 24-inch Turnpike marker. The old assembly has a 48-inch I-70 marker with a 36-inch KTA shield. 12 February 2009

36112
At the end of the Kansas Turnpike, the old I-70 marker with US 40 and US 69 is in front of the replacement marker which includes the addition of US 24 to this strethc of freeway. 14 February 2009

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Kansas Highway 70

Southwest Endpoint: Junction K-99 west of Reading
Northeast Endpoint: Junction K-31 is Osage City
Counties Passed through: Lyon, Osage

Kansas Highway 71

Length: 4.6 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-63 north of Seneca
East Endpoint: South City Limits of Bern
Counties Passed through: Nemaha

Kansas Highway 72

South Endpoint: Junction US 24-40 South of Basehor
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Basehor
Counties Passed through: Leavenworth

US Highway 73

A73
Length: 92.5 miles
South Endpoint: I-70 exit 224 in Bonner Springs
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (CG/JJW) south of Falls City, Neb.
Counties Passed through: Wyandotte, Leavenworth, Atchison, Brown

Photos

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36103
14 February 2009

36104
14 February 2009

36105
14 February 2009

36106
14 February 2009

36107
The new south end of US 73 at the I-70 Bonner Springs exit. 14 February 2009

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Truck US Highway 73

A73
South Endpoint: 4th and Spruce, Leavenworth
North Endpoint: 4th and Pawnee, Leavenworth
Counties Passed through: Leavenworth

History

When US 154 was re-designated as K-154 in 1982, the US 154 Spur was re-designated as K-129. In February 1997, a new bypass around the southeastern part of Dodge City was completed, connecting to K-129. The new bypass was given the designation of US 56-283, and K-129 was re-designated as US 56-283-400.

Photos

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47543
A "No Trucks" sign is posted on the northbound signal at 4th and Spruce in Leavenworth. This marks the south junction of US 73/K-7 and K-92, along with the south end of the truck route along 3rd Street. 29 August 2013

US Highway 73E

DP5073
South Endpoint: Junction US 73W/US 73 at Oswego
North Endpoint: Junction US 73W/73 at Horton
Counties Passed through: Labette, Cherokee, Crawford, Bourbon, Linn, Miami, Johnson, Wyandotte, Leavenworth, Atchison, Brown

US Highway 73W

DP5073
South Endpoint: Junction US 73E/US 73 at Oswego
North Endpoint: Junction US 73E/73 at Horton
Counties Passed through: Labette, Neosho, Allen, Anderson, Franklin, Douglas, Jefferson, Atchison, Brown

Kansas Highway 74 (1927-2013)

Length: 3.440 miles
West Endpoint: Intersection with Rawlins Road, Potter
East Endpoint: Junction US 73 east of Potter
Counties Passed through: Atchison

History

K-74 shows up on the 1927 State Highway map as a dirt road. It was gravelled by 1930 and hard surfaced by 1936. The road was turned over to Atchison County in December of 2013

US Highway 75

A75
Length: 226 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Caney
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line north of Sabetha
Counties Passed through: Montgomery, Wilson, Woodson, Coffey, Osage, Shawnee, Jackson, Brown, Nemaha

Photos

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Business US Highway 75

Length: 1.5 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 75 south of Altoona.
North Endpoint: Junction US 75 north of Altoona.
Counties Passed through: Wilson

Kansas Highway 76

Length: 0.3 miles
South Endpoint: Williamstown
North Endpoint: Junction US 24-59 north of Williamstown
Counties Passed through: Jefferson

US Highway 77

A77
Length: 234 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Arkansas City
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (CG/JJW) north of Marysville
Counties Passed through: Cowley, Butler, Marion, Dickinson, Morris, Geary, Riley, Marshall

Photos

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43923
This Bridge takes the BNSF Emporia Sub over US 54/77 on the south end of El Dorado. Watch your head. 4 June 2012

43928
Approaching the North end of Arkansas City, traffic wishing to continue onto US 77 must turn left to get on the Arkansas City Bypass. Summit Street is old US 77, which also carried the US 77B designation briefly. 4 June 2012

47019
This brown guide sign on I-70 for the Milford Lake Nature Center and Fitch Hatchery features a single black border around the US 77 shield. 20 July 2013

Truck US Highway 77

Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Butler

Business US Highway 77 (Cowley County)

Length: 4 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 77/166 south of Arkansas City
North Endpoint: Junction US 77 north of Arkansas City
Counties Passed through: Cowley

Photos

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43928
Approaching the North end of Arkansas City, traffic wishing to continue onto US 77 must turn left to get on the Arkansas City Bypass. Summit Street is old US 77, which also carried the US 77B designation briefly. 4 June 2012

Business US Highway 77 (Dickinson County)

Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Dickinson

Business US Highway 77 (Geary County)

Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Geary

Kansas Highway 78

Length: 2 miles
South Endpoint: Miller
North Endpoint: Junction US 56 north of Miller
Counties Passed through: Lyon

Kansas Highway 79

Length: 3.6 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-16 west of Hoton
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Circleville
Counties Passed through: Jackson

Kansas Highway 80

Length: 3.8 miles
West Endpoint: East City Limits of Morgaonville
East Endpoint: Junction K-15 north of Clay Center
Counties Passed through: Clay

US Highway 81

A81
Length: 230.2 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Caldwell
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (CG/JJW) north of Belleville
Counties Passed through: Sumner, Sedgwick, Harvey, McPherson, Saline, Ottawa, Cloud, Republic

Photos

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43957
The Overhead Gantry on the Kansas Turnpike/I-35 northbound at the exit for I-135, I-235, and US 81 in South Wichita. The overhead advisory speed plate is an unapproved use of the Clearview typeface. Clearview is approved only on light-on-dark colored signs. 4 June 2012

47040
First of Two: The guide signs for the exit from westbound I-70 to Southbound I-135/US 81 warns of the 25 MPH advisory speed on the cloverleaf loop ramp. 20 July 2013

47041
Second of Two: The guide signs for the exit from westbound I-70 to Southbound I-135/US 81 warns of the 25 MPH advisory speed on the cloverleaf loop ramp. Also, the reassurance marker for westbound I-70 has been replaced by the advance guide sign for the next exit west. 20 July 2013

47042
Unlike I-70, the guide signs on I-135/US 81 do *not* have the advisory speed for the loop ramps posted on the guide signs. This assembly, just before the exit ramp from southbound I-135 to eastbound I-70, also has the first advance guide sign for State Street/K-140. 20 July 2013

47070
This reassurance marker on I-135/US 81 on the south end of McPherson features a ugly "straight out of Microsoft" typeface for the I-135 shield. 20 July 2013

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Business US Highway 81 (McPherson)

Length: 7.4 miles
South Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 58, concurrent with K-61
North Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 60, concurrent with US 56
Counties Passed through: McPherson

Photos

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Business US Highway 81 (Lindsborg)

Length: 8.5 miles
South Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 72
North Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 78, concurrent with K-4
Counties Passed through: McPherson, Saline

Photos

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Alternate US Highway 81

Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: McPherson

Kansas Highway 82

A82
Length: 21.1 miles
Southwest Endpoint: Junction K-15 west of Wakefield
Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 24 west of Leonardville
Counties Passed through: Clay, Riley

US Highway 83

A83
Length: 225 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Liberal
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (JJW north of Oberlin
Counties Passed through: Seward, Haskell, Finney, Scott, Logan, Thomas, Sheridan, Decatur, Norton, Phillips

Business US Highway 83

Length: 5.717 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 83 south of Garden City
North Endpoint: Junction US 50/83/400 northwest of Garden City, continues north as US 83
Counties Passed through: Finney
Average Annual Daily Traffic
Junction Guide

Spur US Highway 83

Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Finney

Kansas Highway 84

Length: 0.8 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Penokee
North Endpoint: Junction US 24 north of Penokee
Counties Passed through: Graham

Kansas Highway 85

Length: 0.9 miles
South Endpoint: North city limits of Morland
North Endpoint: Junction US 24 north of Morland
Counties Passed through: Graham

Kansas Highway 86

Length: 0.3 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 56 south Canton, continues south as RS 304
North Endpoint: South city limits of Canton, continues north as RS 304
Counties Passed through: McPherson

Kansas Highway 87

Length: 8.6 miles
South Endpoint: Viets
North Endpoint: Junction US 36 west of Baileyville
Counties Passed through: Nemaha

Kansas Highway 88

Length: 0.3 miles
South Endpoint: Vermillion
North Endpoint: Junction K-9 north of Vermillion
Counties Passed through: Nemaha

Kansas Highway 89

Length: 1.5 miles
South Endpoint: North city limits of Halstead
North Endpoint: Junction US 50 north of Halstead
Counties Passed through: McPherson

Kansas Highway 90

West Endpoint: Leavenworth State Fishing Lake
East Endpoint: Junction K-16 northwest of Tonganoxie
Counties Passed through: Leavenworth

Kansas Highway 92

A92
Length: 42 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-4 northeast of Meriden
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line at Leavenworth
Counties Passed through: Jefferson, Leavenworth

Photos

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47543
A "No Trucks" sign is posted on the northbound signal at 4th and Spruce in Leavenworth. This marks the south junction of US 73/K-7 and K-92, along with the south end of the truck route along 3rd Street. 29 August 2013

47544
Aside from being a rather odd looking K-16 shield, 16 does not turn right up ahead. We're on K-92 in McLouth, and this should really be a K-92 shield. K-16 continues east and west at the stop sign, 92 turns south to west. 29 August 2013

Kansas Highway 93

West Endpoint: Junction US 81 east of Minneapolis
East Endpoint: Ottawa State Fishing Lake
Counties Passed through: Ottawa

Kansas Highway 94

Length: 10.7 miles
South Endpoint: Clark State Fishing Lake
North Endpoint: Junction US 54 in Kingsdown
Counties Passed through: Clark, Ford

Kansas Highway 95

Length: 6.6 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 83 North of Scott City
North Endpoint: Junction US 83 East of Scott County State Lake
Counties Passed through: Scott

Kansas Highway 96

A96
Length: 297 miles
West Endpoint: Colorado State Line west of Tribune
East Endpoint: Junction US 54-400 in Wichita
Counties Passed through: Greeley, Wichita, Scott, Lane, Ness, Rush, Barton, Reno, Sedgwick, Butler, Greenwood, Wilson, Montgomery, Labette, Cherokee

History

Legend has it that the number for K-96 came from Wichita service station operator F.W. "Woody" Hockaday, who, out of his own picket, placed signs marking the routes in Kansas, and other parts of the Southwest, with early versions of guide signs, with a big red "H" to plug his business1. According to the legend, The Kansas-Colorado Boulevard had the most number of Hockaday's signs along the highway, so the state allowed him to choose the number. According to the legend, 96 was the phone number for his shop2. However, that legend is apocryphal. By the time Kansas had established its state highway system, the surrounding states had already developed theirs.3 In particular, Colorado had numbered its portion of the Kansas-Colorado Boulevard as highway 96 as early as 1923.4 5 When Kansas established its highway system, highways that ended at the state line were given the same number as the adjoining state's highway. Thus, K-96 was numbered as an extension of Colorado 96. Also, a check of the Polk City directory for Wichita shows that the number for Hockaday's shop was 'Market 102.'6

When the state highway system was established, K-96 was hard-surfaced from Ellinwood to Silica in Barton County, Sterling in Rice County to Hutchinson in Reno County, Maize in Sedgwick County (through Wichita) to Beaumont, and from Independence to the junction with K-16 in Montgomery County. Gravel segments were from Nekoma to Rush Center in Rush County, Great Bend to Ellinwood in, New Albany to Independence, and from Altamount to the east end of the highway at US 66 west of Galena.7 In 1928, K-96 was graveled through Wichita and Scott Counties, from Andale to Maize in Sedgwick County, and from K-16 to Altamount. A segment that was also concurrent with US 50S east of Hutchinson was paved.8 In 1929, the segment from Andale west to the Reno-Sedgwick County line.9 1930 saw the road graveled from Rush Center heading east, as well as on a short stretch heading south from US 50S east of Hutchinson and full paving completed from Lyons to Sterling.10 1931 saw the road graveled in full from the Ness/Rush County line east to Great Bend.11 In 1932, K-96 was gravelled in Greeley County, and from Ness City east to the Ness/Rush County Line, and also hard-surfaced from Ness City west to the Lane/Ness County Line, from Altamont to Columbus, and from Crestline to US 66.12 1933 saw the hard-surface segment in Ness County extended west to Dighton and east to Alexander. In addition, the gravel segment from K-16 to Altamont was hard-surfaced, as was the Great Bend-Lyons segment (which was concurrent with US 50N).13

In 1936, The Highway Commission started making alignment changes to K-96. A new gravel alignment was built from Fall River straight east to K-39 north of Fredonia, bypassing New Albany. The roadway from Fall River west to K-11 near Severy was also graveled, along with the segment from US 50S to the Reno/Sedgwick County Line.14 The remainder of K-96 from Severy to Beaumont was graveled by 1937. Also in 1937, the segment from Alexander to Rush Center was hard-surfaced. In addition, the segment between Fredonia and the K-34 junction was paved, as was K-34 between K-96 and Neodesha. The paved K-34 was re-designated K-96, and the former K-96 (which had just been graveled in 1933) was re-designated as K-39.15

In 1938, the segment from Selkirk to Leoti was hard-surfaced, as were the segment from the Wichita/Scott County line to Dighton, the segment from US 50S to Maize, and part of the segment from Columbus to Crestline.16 By 1940, K-96 was hard-surfaced in Greeley county, and the paving between Columbus and Crestline was completed.17 By 1941, the remainder of K-96 in Wichita County was hard-surfaced18, the roadway from Rush Center to Shaffer was relocated a mile to the south (designated by resolution in 1936)19 as well as a new paved alignment from the K-39 junction south to Fredonia (Designated in 1937,20 alignment slightly modified in 194021). The paved segment of K-96 also extended west to Severy.18 Also, Kansas switched the designations of K-26 and K-96 east of Crestline, and Missouri likewise numbered their continuing roadway as their state highway 96.22

In October of 1940, the highway commission authorized a relocation of K-96 between Shaffer and Great Bend.23 However, World War II suspended the project. The 1945 map shows the rest of the highway hard-surfaced. The relocation was completed by 1950.24 In December 1955, a relocation was authorized to eliminate a "stairstep" at the Colorado state line.25 1957 saw apporvals to remove a stairstep on the Lane/Ness County line26, as well as a alignment shift in Wichita due to construction of the Wichita-Valley Center "Big Ditch" Floodway.27 In November 1958, work was approve to relocate the highway between Yaggy and Nickerson.28 These projects were completed by 1960.29

In 1953, Colorado and Kansas Petitioned AASHO to give their multi-state highway 96 a U.S. Highway designation.30 Although I do not have any information on the disposition of this request, obviously, highway 96 remained a state numbered highway.

The 1960s brought change to K-96 between Wichita and Hutchinson. The first section to begin was the section between K-17 south of Hutchinson and the town of Haven.31 The segment from Haven to Mount Hope quickly followed,32 and the entire segment was completed by 1962.33 The next part of the road, from Mount Hope to Wichita, was started in 196534 and finished by 1969.35 When the new alignment was opened, the old highway between Mount Hope and Maize was re-designated as K-296.34 Meanwhile, in Labette County, a segment near Mound Valley was bypassed to the south. Construction began in 196636 and was finished by 1967.37

In 1970, a proposal was presented for a new northeast freeway in Wichita connecting US 54 to K-254. The Highway Commission approved a resolution designating the new roadway as K-96. At the same time, a new alignment from I-235to Maize was under consideration.38 By 1978, the new road was completed as far as Ridge Road, and K-96 was shifted onto a temporary alignment on Ridge Road south to 21st, then on 21st East to Zoo Boulevard, then south on I-235 to US 54 east.39 The new route from Ridge Road east to I-235 was completed by 1981. K-96 was then re-routed south on I-135 from 235 to US 54, then east on US 54.40 In 1981, work began on a new freeway alignment on US 54/US 77/K-96 east from August to the US 54-77/K-96 junction.41 Work was completed by 1987.42

The 1990s saw changes that led to the the road's eventual trucation to Wichita. In 1988, work finally began on the Northeast bypass. However; the alignment was changed compared to the original 1970 proposal. The selected alignment now meets US 54 3 miles east of the original proposal and, instead of ending at K-254, the new freeway has its nortwest end at I-135.43 The New freeway was shown as complete to 13th Street by 199344 and from 13th Street to US 54 by 1995.45 In May of 1994, work began on relocating K-96 from Beaumont east about 4 1/2 miles.46 In December of 1994, KDOT designated a new highway, US 400, across southern Kansas. 400 was co-designated with K-96 from Wichita east to Fredonia.47 In 1995, work began on the new US 400, running from North of Fredonia, bypassing Fredonia on the east and Neodesha to the west48 before turning east to US 160 north of Cherryvale.49 Meanwhile, the route from Wichita to Hutchinson was 4-laned, and a new 2-lane alignment on the west side of Hutchinson began construction.50 The final truncation of K-96 occured in December, 1998, after the new US 400 was opened. K-96 from Independence east to Crestline was re-designated as US 160, and the connection to Missouri was turned over to Crawford County.51 MO 96 was truncated to MO 171, with the segment from MO 171 west to the Kansas line re-designated as State Supplemntal Route YY.

The 4-laning of K-96 between Wichita and Hutchinson, and the bypass of Hutch, was completed by 1999.52

History Notes

1 Sherry Lamb Schirmer and Theodore A. Wilson, Milestones : a history of the Kansas Highway Commission & the Department of Transportation. (Topeka: Kansas Department of Transportation, 1986) 1-21.

2 "Old Brick Highway Deserted Today," Sterling Bulletin, 2 Aug. 1979.

3 Schirmer, 2-28.

4 Matthew Salek, Colorado Routes 80-89 [Colorado Route 96]. Accessed 17 Sept. 1996

5 Salek, Colorado Highways: History. Accessed 17 Sept. 1996

6 Polk-McAvoy Directory Company Wichita City Directory 1917. (Wichita: Eagle Press, 1917) 223

7 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 Jan. 1927.

8 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 Oct. 1928.

9 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 Apr. 1929.

10 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 July 1930.

11 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 15 Jan. 1931.

12 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 Apr. 1932. Accessed 11 Aug. 2013

13 Kansas Highway Commission. Kansas State Highway System [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1 June 1933. Accessed 11 Aug. 2013

14 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, Apr. 1936. Accessed 13 Sept. 2013

15 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, Feb. 1937. Accessed 13 Sept. 2013

16 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, Jan. 1938. Accessed 13 Sept. 2013

17 Kansas State Highway Commission. Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, Feb. 1940. Accessed 6 Sept. 2013

18 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Travel Kansas: Cross-roads of a Continent [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1941. Accessed 6 Sept. 2013

19 Kansas State Highway Commission. Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Rush County, Project 96-12-FA 537AB 17 July 1936. Accessed 20 Sept. 2013

20 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Wilson County, Highway K-39 20 Mar. 1937. Accessed 20 Sept. 2013

21 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Resolution for Redesignation of Road in Wilson County, Project 39-103 FA 572 B (1) 27 May 1940. Accessed 21 Sept. 2013

22 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Resolution of the State Highway Commission 26 Feb. 1941. Accessed 21 Sept. 2013

23 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Rush and Barton Counties, Project[s] 96-83 FA 537 D [and] 96-5 FA 537 EF 29 Oct. 1940. Accessed 21 Sept. 2013

24 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Official 1950-51 Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printer, 1950. Accessed 6 Sept. 2013

25 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Greeley County, Project 96-36 F-066-1 (4) 20 Dec. 1955. Accessed 21 Sept. 2013

26 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Lane and Ness Counties, Projects 96-51 F-066-2 (3) [and] 96-68 F-066-2 (5) 24 Apr. 1957. Accessed 21 Sept. 2013

27 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Sedgwick County 13 Feb. 1957. Accessed 21 Sept. 2013

28 State Highway Commission of Kansas Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Reno County, Project 96-78 F-044-1 (1) 13 Feb. 1957. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

29 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Official 1960-61 Kansas Highway Map map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1960. Accessed 21 Sept. 2013

30 "K-96 as a U.S. Highway" Kansas City Times 16 May 1953.

31 State Highway Commission of Kansas Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Reno County, Project 96-78 F-044-1 (2) 8 June 1960. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

32 State Highway Commission of Kansas Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Reno and Sedgwick Counties, Project 96-78 F-044-1 (4) [et. al.] 10 Nov. 1960. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

33 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Official 1962 Kansas Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1962. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

34 State Highway Commission of Kansas Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Sedgwick County, Projects 96-87 F-044-1 (6) [et. al.] 5 May 1965. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

35 State Highway Commission of Kansas. 1969 Kansas Official Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1969. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

36 State Highway Commission of Kansas Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Labette County, Projects 96-50 F-016-1 (10) [et. al.] 9 Feb. 1966. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

37 State Highway Commission of Kansas. Kansas Official Highway Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1967. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

38 State Highway Commission of Kansas Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Sedgwick County 26 Aug. 1970. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

39 Kansas Department of Transpotation. 1978 Kansas Transportaiton Map [Wichita inset] [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1978. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

40 Kansas Department of Transpotation. 1981-82 Kansas Transportaiton Map [Wichita inset] [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1981. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

41 Kansas Department of Transportation. Resolution for the Relocation and Redesignation of a Road in Butler County, Project No. 54-8 K-052-01. 15 Oct. 1981. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013.

42 Kansas Department of Transportation. Resolution To Relocate a Highway in Sedgwick County 14 June 1988. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013.

43 Kansas Department of Transpotation. Kansas Transportaiton Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas State Printing Plant, 1987. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

44 Kansas Department of Transportation. Kansas 1993-94 State Transportation Map [Wichita Insert] [map]. Topeka: Kansas Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Planning, 1993. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

45 Kansas Department of Transportation. Kansas 1995-96 State Transportation Map [Wichita Insert] [map]. Topeka: Kansas Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Planning, 1995. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

46 Kansas Department of Transportation. Resolution To Relocate Segments of Highway in Butler and Greenwood Counties 24 May 1994. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013.

47 Kansas Department of Transportation. Resolution To Establish Highway U.S. 400 in the Following Listed Thirteen Counties in Kansas: Butler, Cherokee, Finney, Ford, Gray, Greenwood, Kingman, Kiowa, Labette, Neosho, Pratt, Sedgwick, Wilson 1 Dec. 1994. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013.

48 Kansas Department of Transportation. Resolution To Realign and Withdraw Segments of Highway in Wilson County, Project K-3294-01 and K-3294-05 3 May 1995. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013.

49 Kansas Department of Transportation. Resolution For New Alignment, New Connector, Removal and Redesignation of Segments of Several Highways in Montgomery County, Project K-4892-01 3 May 1995. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013.

50 Kansas Department of Transportation. [Resolution To Realign and Withdraw Segments of Highway in Reno County,] Project K-5046-01 22 May 1996. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013.

51 Multiple Highway Resolutions were issued on 3 Dec. 1998 to implement the truncation on K-96.

52 Kansas Department of Transpotation. 1999-2000 Kansas Official State Transportaiton Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Planning, 1999. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

52 Kansas Department of Transpotation. 1999-2000 Kansas Official State Transportaiton Map [map]. Topeka: Kansas Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Planning, 1999. Accessed 22 Sept. 2013

Photos

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47127
Ahead of the junction of I-135 and I-235, there is a standard size junction assembly for K-96. 20 July 2013

47128
Here is the last overhead gantry before the exit from southbound I-135 to southbound I-235. The marker for K-96 is tucked off to the side. 20 July 2013

47211
Here's a segment of cable median barrier on K-96 in the northeast part of Wichita 20 July 2013

47213
Just west of the K-96 with Oliver, we have this S-curve. Here, the cable median barrier is placed along the edge of the shoulder. 20 July 2013

47231
The exit guide sign for the K-96 exit with I-35 and 127th Street East (That is the full name of the road). The advance guide signs for the southeast end of the freeway at US 54-400 are a bit cramped... These signs pre-date the addition of US 400. 20 July 2013

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Kansas Highway 97 (1941-1958)

South Endpoint: Junction US 40 3 miles southeast of Quinter
North Endpoint: Sheridan County State Park
Counties Passed through: Gove, Sheridan

Kansas Highway 98

Length: 9 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-23 west of Fowler
East Endpoint: Junction US 54 south of Fowler
Counties Passed through: Meade

Kansas Highway 99

A99
Length: 233 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line South of Chautauqua
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (CG/JJW) north of Summerfield
Counties Passed through: Chautauqua, Elk, Greenwood, Lyon, Wabaunsee, Pottawatomie, Marshall

Kansas Highway 100

South Endpoint: I-70 at Fairlawn Road exit (Exit 357A), Topeka
North Endpoint: Ceder Crest (Kansas Govenors official Residence)
Counties Passed through: Shawnee

Kansas Highway 101

Length: 10 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 166 near Edna
North Endpoint: Junction US 160 west of Altamount
Counties Passed through: Labette

Kansas Highway 102

Length: 5 miles
West Endpoint: West Mineral
East Endpoint: Junction K-7 near Scammon
Counties Passed through: Cherokee

Kansas Highway 103

Length: 7 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-7 west of Weir
East Endpoint: Junction US 69 east of Weir
Counties Passed through: Cherokee

Kansas Highway 104

Length: 2.3 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-4 south of Mentor
North Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 86
Counties Passed through: Saline

Photos

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Kansas Highway 104 ()

Endpoint:
Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Crawford

Kansas Highway 105

Length: 10.2 miles
South Endpoint: Toronto Lake State Park
North Endpoint: Junction US 54 north of Toronto
Counties Passed through: Woodson

Photos

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43917
The south end of K-105 at the south end of Toronto Lake. Interestingly enough, when you reach this end sign, you are facing the northwest. 4 June 2012

43918
Near the south end, K-105 crosses the dam of Toronto Lake. 4 June 2012

43920
The North end of K-105 at US 54 north of Toronto 4 June 2012

Kansas Highway 106

Length: 16.2 miles
Southwest Endpoint: Junction K-18 south of Minneapolis.
Northeast Endpoint: Ottawa County State Park
Counties Passed through: Ottawa

Kansas Highway 107

South Endpoint: Junction K-32 in Edwardsville
North Endpoint: Junction US 24-40 in KCK
Counties Passed through: Wyandotte

Kansas Highway 108

Length: 1.5 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 59 south of Erie
North Endpoint: Junction US 59 north of Erie
Counties Passed through: Neosho

Kansas Highway 110

Length: 1.8 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 south of Axtell
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Axtell
Counties Passed through: Marshall

Kansas Highway 111

South Endpoint: North City Limits of Kanapolis
North Endpoint: Junction K-156 northeast of Ellsworth
Counties Passed through: Ellsworth

Kansas Highway 112

Length: 2.483 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 south of Esbon
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Esbon
Counties Passed through: Jewell

History

On November 10, 1948, the State Highway Commission agreed to maintain a spur road from US 36 to Ebson as part of the state highway system if Jewell County agreed to construct the road to state standards. The road was accepted by the State Engineer on March 30, 1950, and was designated K-112.

The requirments for accepting the roadway into the State Highway system include a provision that the roadway be surfaced with "sand-gravel" of at least 600 cubic yards per mile. The 1953 map (the earliest map available showing K-112) shows the roadway as hard-surfaced.

Kansas Highway 113

South Endpoint: Junction K-18 in the southwest part of Manhattan
North Endpoint: Junction US 24 northwest of Manhattan
Counties Passed through: Riley

Kansas Highway 113 ()

Southeast Endpoint: Junction K-13 southeast of Blue Rapids
Northwest Endpoint: Junction US 77/K-9 in Blue Rapids
Counties Passed through: Marshall

Kansas Highway 114

Length: 0.4 miles
Northwest Endpoint: East City Limits of Ogden
Southeast Endpoint: Junction K-18 east of Ogden
Counties Passed through: Riley

Kansas Highway 114 ()

South Endpoint: Junction US 73 south of Everest
North Endpoint: Everest
Counties Passed through: Brown

Kansas Highway 115

West Endpoint: East City Limits of Palmer
East Endpoint: Junction K-9/K-15 east of Palmer
Counties Passed through: Washington

Kansas Highway 116

West Endpoint: Junction US 75 in Holton
East Endpoint: Junction US 59 northeast of Nortonville
Counties Passed through: Jackson, Atchison

Photos

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43367
The east end of K-116 at US 59 near the community of Cummings in southern Atchison County.

44097
12/8/8 signal heads still grace the traffic light at the intersection of 4th Street (K-16/K-116) and New York Avenue in Holton.

Kansas Highway 117

Length: 12 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 south of Herdon
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (CG/JJW) north of Herndon
Counties Passed through: Rawlins

Kansas Highway 119

South Endpoint: Junction K-9 south of Greenleaf
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Greenleaf
Counties Passed through: Washington

Kansas Highway 120

South Endpoint: Junction K-20 northeast of Denton
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Highland
Counties Passed through: Doniphan

Kansas Highway 121

Length: 0.4 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 south of Stuttgart
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Stuttgart
Counties Passed through: Phillips

Kansas Highway 122

West Endpoint: Junction US 36 west Prarie View
East Endpoint: South City Limits of Prarie View
Counties Passed through: Phillips

Kansas Highway 123

South Endpoint: Junction K-23 14 miles north of Hoxie
North Endpoint: Junction K-383 at Dresden
Counties Passed through: Sheridan, Decatur

History

K-123 was created from a orphaned segment of K-23 between K-9 and Oberlin in 1938 as a consequence of US 183's southward extension.

Kansas Highway 124

West Endpoint: Junction K-14 in Beloit
East Endpoint: Junction US 24 east of Beloit
Counties Passed through: Mitchell

History

K-124 was added to the state system by 1963, replacing K-129 as the spur from US 24 into Beloit. 124 was removed from the State highway system by 1987.

Kansas Highway 126

West Endpoint: Junction US 400 south of McCune
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line east of Pittsburg
Counties Passed through: Crawford

Kansas Highway 128

Length: 36.8 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 24 northwest of Glen Elder
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (CG/JJW) south of Guide Rock, Neb. Continues north as NE 78
Counties Passed through: Mitchell, Jewell

Kansas Highway 129 (1982-1997)

Length: 0.446 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-154 in Dodge City
North Endpoint: Junction US 56-283 in Dodge City
Counties Passed through: Ford

Kansas Highway 129 (1953-1963)

South Endpoint: North City Limits of Beloit
North Endpoint: Junction US 24/K-9 north of Beloit
Counties Passed through: Mitchell

History

K-129 was created when US 24 was re-routed along the east side of town. It was removed around 1963, when a new spur, K-124 was opened on the east side of Beloit.

Kansas Highway 130

Length: 7.8 miles
South Endpoint: North city limits of Hartford
North Endpoint: Junction I-35/US 50 north of Neosho Rapids
Counties Passed through: Lyon, Coffey

Kansas Highway 131

Length: 0.5 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Lebo
North Endpoint: Junction I-35/US 50 north of Lebo
Counties Passed through: Coffey

Kansas Highway 132

Length: 5.3 miles
West Endpoint: Junction I-70/US 40 at Turner Diagonal, KCK
East Endpoint: Junction US 69 on Kansas Avenue, KCK
Counties Passed through: Wyandotte

Kansas Highway 133

South Endpoint: Junction US 160 south of Dennis
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Dennis
Counties Passed through: Labette

Kansas Highway 134

Length: 0.2 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 166 south of Bartlett
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Bartlett
Counties Passed through: Labette

Interstate 135

Length: 95.1 miles
South Endpoint: I-35 exit 42 in Wichita
North Endpoint: I-70 exit 250 in Salina
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick, Harvey, McPherson, Saline

Photos

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47198
Looking north from ground level at the I-135 Canal Route. 20 July 2013

47199
Looking south from ground level at the I-135 Canal Route. 20 July 2013

47277
The South end of I-235 at I-135 in Wichita. Note that the US 81 markers are posted at ground level on the gantry posts. 20 July 2012

43957
The Overhead Gantry on the Kansas Turnpike/I-35 northbound at the exit for I-135, I-235, and US 81 in South Wichita. The overhead advisory speed plate is an unapproved use of the Clearview typeface. Clearview is approved only on light-on-dark colored signs. 4 June 2012

47040
First of Two: The guide signs for the exit from westbound I-70 to Southbound I-135/US 81 warns of the 25 MPH advisory speed on the cloverleaf loop ramp. 20 July 2013

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Kansas Highway 135

West Endpoint: Junction K-7 west of La Cynge
East Endpoint: Junction US 69 east of La Cynge
Counties Passed through: Linn

Kansas Highway 136 (2005-)

South Endpoint: North City Limits of Troy
North Endpoint: Junction US 36 North of Troy
Counties Passed through: Doniphan

History

In May of 2004, a resolution was issued re-designating K-7 between the North city limits of Troy and US 36 as the second K-136, effective upon the opening of the new K-7 alignment bypassing Troy to the west. The new K-7 opened in November of 2005.

Interestingly, the new K-136 was built as part of the project realigning US 36 between Troy and Highland which removed the first K-136.

Photos

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37221
The North end of K-136 at US 36 north of Troy.

37223
The first K-136 marker just past the US 36 interchange. Out of six K-136 markers posted, only the two at the North End are of the 3-digit variety. The rest of them are 2 digit signs.

37224
The South end of K-136 at the Troy City Limits.

Kansas Highway 136 (1945-1991)

Length: 0.3 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 east of Highland
North Endpoint: Iowa Sac and Fox Indian Mission
Counties Passed through: Doniphan

History

The first K-136 was designated by resolution in October, 1945, connecting US 36 with the Iowa Sac and Fox Indian Mission east of Highland in Doniphan County. It was not hard-surfaced until 1965, and was one of the last Kansas Highways to be paved.

In October, 1985, a resolution was issued removing K-136 from the state highway system upon the conclusion of a project that re-aligned US 36 between Highland and Troy. The US 36 re-alignment was completed in April 1991.

Interestingly, a portion of roadway that was constructed as part of the US 36 re-alignment would become the second K-136

Kansas Highway 137

Length: 0.2 miles
South Endpoint: Purcell
North Endpoint: Junction K-20 north of Purcell
Counties Passed through: Doniphan

Kansas Highway 138

Length: 1.1 miles
West Endpoint: I-70 exit 333 west of Paxico
East Endpoint: West City Limits of Paxico
Counties Passed through: Wabaunsee

Kansas Highway 139

Length: 1 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Cuba
North Endpoint: Junction US 36 north of Cuba
Counties Passed through: Republic

Kansas Highway 140

Length: 33.1 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-14 in Ellsworth
East Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 93 in Salina
Counties Passed through: Ellsworth, Saline

Photos

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47042
Unlike I-70, the guide signs on I-135/US 81 do *not* have the advisory speed for the loop ramps posted on the guide signs. This assembly, just before the exit ramp from southbound I-135 to eastbound I-70, also has the first advance guide sign for State Street/K-140. 20 July 2013

Kansas Highway 141

Length: 13.4 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-4 south of Kanapolis Resovoir
North Endpoint: Junction K-140 6 miles west of Brookville
Counties Passed through: Ellsworth

Kansas Highway 143

Length: 4.6 miles
South Endpoint: I-70 exit 252, Salina
North Endpoint: Junction US 81 north of Salina
Counties Passed through: Saline

Kansas Highway 144

Length: 16.8 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 160 6 miles north of Sublette
East Endpoint: Junction US 56 northwest of Copeland
Counties Passed through: Haskell, Gray

Kansas Highway 145

Northwest Endpoint: Junction US 83/160 north of Sublette
Southeast Endpoint: Junction K-45 in Sublette
Counties Passed through: Haskell

Kansas Highway 146

West Endpoint: Junction US 59 2 miles north of Erie
East Endpoint: Junction K-3 5 miles east of Walnut
Counties Passed through: Neosho, Crawford

Kansas Highway 147

South Endpoint: Junction K-4 east of Brownell
North Endpoint: Ogallah
Counties Passed through: Ness, Trego

Kansas Highway 148

Southwest Endpoint: Junction K-14 in Jewell
Northeast Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (CG/JJW)7 miles north of Hanover
Counties Passed through: Jewell, Republic, Washington

Kansas Highway 149

Length: 6.1 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 56 10 miles east of Herrington
North Endpoint: Junction K-4 4 miles south of White City
Counties Passed through: Morris

Kansas Highway 150

West Endpoint: Junction US 56/77 northeast of Marion
East Endpoint: Junction US 50 near Elmdale
Counties Passed through: Marion, Chase

Kansas Highway 150 (Johnson County)

West Endpoint: Junction K-7 in Olathe
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line in Leawood
Counties Passed through: Johnson

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

47430
At the 135th Street exit ramp on US 69, there is a destination sign for Grandview and Olathe.... a remnant of when 135th Street was a state highway. 10 August 2013

48732
For some reason, this guide sign, indicating directions to US 69 and I-35, is located on 135th Street just west of Nall. This distance sign, in a unusual move, explicitly states the unit of measurment. Based on the style and the orange sticker on the back, the sign dates back to when 135th was K-150. 19 April 2014

Kansas Highway 152

Length: 12.9 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-7 west of La Cynge
East Endpoint: Junction US 69 east of La Cynge
Counties Passed through: Linn

Kansas Highway 153

Length: 3.5 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-61 southwest of McPherson
North Endpoint: Junction US 56 west of McPherson, continues north as RS 1961
Counties Passed through: McPherson

Spur Kansas Highway 153

Length: 1.2 miles
Southeast Endpoint: Junction K-61 southwest of McPherson, continues Southeast as RS 2043
Northwest Endpoint: Junction K-153 southwest of McPherson
Counties Passed through: McPherson

US Highway 154 (1926-1981)

Kansas Highway 154 (1981-1997)

West Endpoint: Junction US 50 in Dodge City
East Endpoint: Junction US 54 near Mullinville
Counties Passed through: Ford, Kiowa

Spur US Highway 154

Length: 0.446 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 154 in Dodge City.
North Endpoint: Junction US 50A/US 56/US 283 in Dodge City
Counties Passed through: Ford

Kansas Highway 155 (proposed 1965)

South Endpoint: I-35W/US 81 exit 72
North Endpoint: Junction K-4 in Lindsborg
Counties Passed through: McPherson

History

The August 1966 resolution authorizing construction of I-35W in McPherson County also authorized a connection from the new interstate to Lindsborg from the south. The initial resolution declared that this route would carry the designation of K-155.

However, several months later, in March of 1967, the Highway Commission elected to change the designation to US 81. The designation change was pencil-noted on the resolution, and the new segment of state highway was opened as US 81 when I-35W was opened in 1969.

In 1981, the Lindsborg connection was re-designated US 81B and in 2009, the route was turned back to McPherson County.

US Highway 156 (1956-1981)

Kansas Highway 156 (1981-

Length: 176.4 miles
Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 50B in Garden City
Northeast Endpoint: I-70 exit 225 northeast of Ellsworth
Counties Passed through: Finney, Hodgeman, Pawnee, Barton, Ellsworth

Kansas Highway 157

Length: 3.9 miles
Southwest Endpoint: Rock Springs 4-H Camp
Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 77 8 miles south of Junction City
Counties Passed through: Geary

Kansas Highway 158

Length: 1.8 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 69, Metcalf and Johnson Drive, Overland Park/Mission
East Endpoint: Junction K-58, Johnson and Roe Avenue, Mission/Roeland Park
Counties Passed through: Johnson

US Highway 159

Length: 58.9 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 59 in Nortonville
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (CG/JJW) south of Falls City, NE
Counties Passed through: Jefferson, Atchison, Brown

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

43368
The junction assembly for US 159/K-4A on southbound US 59 near Nortonville also features a reassurance marker for westbound K-4, which begins just past the US 159 junction.

43369
Here's the guide assembly directing southbound `US 59 traffic at the US 159/K-4A junction. Technically, there should be a "TO" marker between the US 59 and K-4 markers.

US Highway 160

A160
Length: 471 miles
West Endpoint: Colorado State Line southwest of Johnson City
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line east of Frontenac
Counties Passed through: Stanton, Grant, Haskell, Seward, Meade, Clark, Comanche, Kiowa, Barber, Harper, Sumner, Cowley, Elk, Montgomery, Labette, Cherokee, Crawford.

History

US 160 in Kansas initially replaced the First K-12. Originally, US 160 turned straight west from Johnson City to into Colorado. By 1955, US 160 was relocated (the Colorado section is CO 116). In addition, 160 ran through Belvidire, Sun City, and Lake City, but was bypassed by a straight short-cut.

In 1999, US 160 between US 169 and US 69 was re-designated as US 400, and the former K-96 between Independence and Crestline was re-designated as US 160.

Kansas Highway 161

Length: 17 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 at Bird City
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line CG/JJW) south of Benkelman, Neb.
Counties Passed through: Cheyenne

Kansas Highway 163 (1966-2013)

Length: 0.485 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Garden Plain
North Endpoint: Junction US 54/400 north of Garden Plain
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick

History

K-163 was established by resolution dated August 10, 1966, in conjunction with the relocation of US 54 as a freeway to the north of Garden Plain.

K-163 was removed from the state highway system and turned over to Sedgwick County on June 1, 2013.

Kansas Highway 164 (1967-1985)

Length: 0.427 miles
West Endpoint: Junction of 85th Street North and Broadway, Valley Center
East Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 17
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick

History

K-164, along with K-165, was established by resolution on January 27, 1967, along with the authority to build I-35W from 101st Street north to the Harvey/McPherson County line. The new freeway was complete by 1971.

K-164 was withdrawn from the state highway system, and turned back to Sedgwick County, on June 3, 1985.

Kansas Highway 165 (1967-1985)

Length: 0.928 miles
South Endpoint: East city limits of Hesston.
North Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 40
Counties Passed through: Harvey

US Highway 166

Length: 169 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 81 in South Haven
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line Baxter Springs
Counties Passed through: Sumner, Cowley, Chautauqua, Montgomery, Labette, Cherokee

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

45840
At the junction of US 69A with US 166 in Baxter Springs, the route marker assembly is posted on the traffic signal. In addition, the destination guide assembly is also on the traffic signal. 13 December 2012

45842
The destination guide sign on eastbound US 166 at the junction with US 400 east of Baxter Springs uses the Junction with I-44 for the destination on eastbound US 166/400, and Parsons for westbound US 400.

Business US Highway 166

Length: 6 miles
South Endpoint:
North Endpoint:
Counties Passed through: Chautauqua

Kansas Highway 167

South Endpoint: Junction K-96 south of Marinethal
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Merenthal
Counties Passed through: Wichita

Kansas Highway 168

South Endpoint: Junction US 56 /K-15 south of Lerigh
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Lehigh
Counties Passed through: Marion

US Highway 169

South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line in Coffeyville
North Endpoint: Missouri State Line on the Lewis and Clark Viaduct in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Montgomery, Labette, Neosho, Allen, Anderson, Franklin, Miami, Johnson, Wyandotte

Photos

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37042
An oversized reassurance marker for I-435, US 50, and US 169 between the Antioch and Metcalf interchange. It is interesting that the elected to add a US 169 marker here, as the plan called for US 169 to be re-designated onto I-35 and the Shawnee Mission Parkway.

37043
On the gantry just before the Metcalf exit on I-435 eastbound, there is an oversized trailblazer for US 169. For the time being, US 169 is still on Metcalf between 435 and Shawnee Mission Parkway. However, 169 will eventually be re-routed.

37499
The first of the new signs on I-70 entering Kansas which feature I-70, US 24, US 40, and US 169, plus reflect the removal of Minnesota Avenue from the state highway system. 11 June 2009

37501
Here is the new signs for the Minnesota Avenue exit. The alternating flashing amber arrows were retained in the new sign for I-70 and US 169. US 40 was added, and US 24 was moved from Minnesota Ave. 11 June 2009

44424
At the approach to the loop ramp from Southbound Metcalf to Eastbound Shawnee Mission Parkway, a new post and guide marker have been installed for US 169. 14 July 2012

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Buisness US 169

Length: 2.811 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 169 eouth of Garnett, concurrent with US 59 and K-31
Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 169 east of Garnett, on 6th Avenue.
Counties Passed through:

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

41080
The south end of US 169B at the junction of US 59 with US 169 on the south side of Garnett

43817
First off, US 169B goes straight as well as to the left. Also, there should be a straight-ahead arrow under the US 59/K-31 assembly. This gaff stems from a temporary closure of US 59, which someone forgot to change back.

43818
This assembly references US 169B and US 59, but someone forgot to include K-31.

Kansas Highway 170

Southwest Endpoint: Junction K-99 west of Reading
Northeast Endpoint: Junction K-31 is Osage City
Counties Passed through: Lyon, Osage

Kansas Highway 171 (Crawford County)

Length: 4.9 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 69 south of Pittsburg
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line southeast of Pittsburg
Counties Passed through: Cherokee

Kansas Highway 171 (Rice County)

South Endpoint: North city limits of Bushton
East Endpoint: Junction K-4 north of Bushton
Counties Passed through: Rice

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

30823
The south end of the Rice County K-171 at the city limits of Bushton. 14 July 2007

30824
Coming out of Bushton on K-171, this distance sign is shown, although those destinations are not directly served by K-171. 14 July 2007

30825
Here's an end-to-end view of the Rice County K-171. 14 July 2007

30827
The North end of Rice County K-171 at K-4 north of Bushton. 14 July 2007

Kansas Highway 173

Length: 0.7 miles
South Endpoint: Densmore
North Endpoint: Junction K-9 north of Densmore
Counties Passed through: Norton

Kansas Highway 174

West Endpoint: Junction US 75/K-31 west of Melvern
East Endpoint: West City Limits of Melvern
Counties Passed through: Osage

Kansas Highway 175

Length: 0.5 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Marquette
North Endpoint: Junction K-4 north of Marquette
Counties Passed through: McPherson

Kansas Highway 176

South Endpoint: North City Limits of Lucas
North Endpoint: Junction K-18 north of Lucas
Counties Passed through: Russell

Kansas Highway 177

South Endpoint: Junction US 54 east of El Dorado
North Endpoint: Junction US 24 in Manhattan
Counties Passed through: Butler, Chase, Morris, Wabaunsee, Geary, Riley

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

47012
The first of two shots for Kansas State University on I-70 at the K-177 exit. The first is for the future National Bio and Agro-Defense facility (politics willing) The sign also features a double border around the K-177 shield. 20 July 2013

47013
The second Kansas State attraction advertised on I-70 at the K-177 exit is the K-State Gardens and Art Museum. Like the first sign, the second sign also features a double-border on the K-177 shield. 20 July 2013

47307
This sign on the Kansas Turnpike is just wrong on so many levels. The margins are poor. The initial letters on each word are clearly larger than the rest of the letters, "North" should be in all caps (the larger "N" here is correct.) To top it off, since this sign is advising of a recreational area, it should be brown, not green. I don't mind the inset border on the K-177 shield, though. 20 July 2013

US Highway 177

Length: 3.5 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line South of South Haven
North Endpoint: Junction US 81 in South Haven
Counties Passed through: Sumner

Kansas Highway 178

Length: 3.5 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 2 miles west of Seneca
North Endpoint: St. Benedict
Counties Passed through: Nemaha

Kansas Highway 179

Length: 11.6 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line North of Manchester, Okla.
North Endpoint: Junction K-44 in Anthony
Counties Passed through: Harper

Kansas Highway 180

South Endpoint: Junction K-4 south of Alta Vista
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Alta Vista
Counties Passed through: Wabaunsee

Kansas Highway 181

South Endpoint: Junction K-231 at east edge of Wilson Dam
North Endpoint: Junction US 36/281 south of Lebanon
Counties Passed through: Russell, Lincoln, Mitchell, Osbourne, Smith

Kansas Highway 182

South Endpoint: Junction US 36 south of Bellaire
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Bellaire
Counties Passed through: Smith

US Highway 183

A183
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Sitka
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line north of Phillipsburg
Counties Passed through: Clark, Comanche, Kiowa, Edwards, Pawnee, Rush, Ellis, Rooks, Phillips, Norton, Decatur

History

US 183 first appeared in 1930 as a re-designation of K-23 between US 83 near Dresden north to the Nebraska border near Cedar Bluffs. By 1936, 183 had been graveled from the border to where the original road turned east south of Oberlin. The road was re-aligned straight to the south from Oberlin by the beginning of 1938, shifting the endpoint from Dresden to Selden.

In the fall of 1938, US 183 extended south to Texas. From Oberlin, US 183 followed US 36 east to Phillipsburg, K-1 from Phillipsburg south to Coldwater, US 160 from Coldwater west to Sitka, and K-34 from Sitka south to the Oklahoma Border.

In the fall of 1941, US 183 was moved to the old US 83 alignment Near Wodruff. K-1 between Phillipsburg and the junction with the former US 83 was designated as US 183, as was the entire K-1/US 183 concurrency.

Bypass US Highway 183

Length: 4.9 miles
Southeast Endpoint: Junction US 183 south of Hays
Northwest Endpoint: Junction I-70 west of Hays
Counties Passed through: Ellis

Kansas Highway 184

Length: 1.6 miles
South Endpoint: I-70US 24 exit 36
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Brewster
Counties Passed through: Thomas

Kansas Highway 185

Length: 0.7 miles
South Endpoint: North city limits of McFarland
North Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 330
Counties Passed through: Wabaunsee

Kansas Highway 186

Length: 1.6 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Menlo
North Endpoint: Junction US 24 north of Menlo
Counties Passed through: Thomas

Kansas Highway 187

Length: 8 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-9 in Centralia
North Endpoint: Junction US 36 4 miles west of Seneca
Counties Passed through: Nemaha

Kansas Highway 188

Length: 2 miles
South Endpoint: Seguin
North Endpoint: Junction US 24 8 miles west of Hoxie
Counties Passed through: Sheridan

Kansas Highway 189

Length: 0.9 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Miltonvale
North Endpoint: Junction US 24 north of Miltonvale
Counties Passed through: Cloud

Kansas Highway 190

Length: 23 miles
Northwest Endpoint: Junction US 160 4 miles north of Ryus
Southeast Endpoint: Junction US 83-160 7 miles south of Sublette
Counties Passed through: Grant, Haskell, Seward

Kansas Highway 191

West Endpoint: Geographical Center of the United States
East Endpoint: Junction US 281 north of Lebanon
Counties Passed through: Smith

Kansas Highway 192

West Endpoint: Junction US 59/K-16 west of Winchestor
East Endpoint: Junction US 73/K-7
Counties Passed through: Jefferson, Leavenworth

Kansas Highway 193

Length: 0.5 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Asherville
North Endpoint: Junction US 24 north of Asherville
Counties Passed through: Mitchell

Kansas Highway 194

Length: 1.6 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Simpson
North Endpoint: Junction US 24 north of Simpson
Counties Passed through: Mitchell

Kansas Highway 195

South Endpoint: Junction K-31 south of Harveryville
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Harveyville
Counties Passed through: Wabaunsee

Kansas Highway 196

Northwest Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 22
Southeast Endpoint: Junction K-254 west of El Dorado
Counties Passed through: Harvey, Butler

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

Kansas Highway 197

Length: 2.3 miles
West Endpoint: Industry
East Endpoint: Junction K-15 17 miles south of Clay Center
Counties Passed through: Dickinson

Kansas Highway 198

South Endpoint: I-70/US 40 exit 115
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Collyer
Counties Passed through: Trego

Kansas Highway 199

Length: 0.8 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Courtland
North Endpoint: Junction US 36 north of Courtland
Counties Passed through: Republic

Kansas Highway 201 (1958-2013)

Length: 0.786 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 59/K-39 west of Stark
East Endpoint: West city limits of Stark, contines east as 220th Road
Counties Passed through: Neosho

History

K-201 was designated by resolution dated July 16, 1958, alongside K-202 and K-203, as a result of the realignment of K-6 in Neosho and Allen counties. 201 was created out of a former segment of K-6 and K-39 from the city limits of Stark west to the new K-6/K-39.[1]

It is uncertain at this point, but it is believed that upon the opening of the new alignment, K-6 was re-designated US 59

K-201 was withdrawn from the state highway system and turned over to Allen County on June 3, 2013.[2]

History Notes

1 Kansas Highway Commission Resolution For Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Neosho and Allen Counties 16 July 1958. Accessed 24 Oct. 2013

2 Kansas Department of Transportation Resolution To Withdraw K-201 in Neosho County, Kansas 3 June 2013. Accessed 24 Oct. 2013

Kansas Highway 202 (1958-2013)

Length: 0.698 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 59 west of Savonburg, continues west as Arizona Road/RS 1153
East Endpoint: West city limits of Savonburg, continues east as Arizona Road/RS 1153
Counties Passed through: Allen

History

K-202 was designated by resolution dated July 16, 1958, alongside K-201 and K-203, as a result of the realignment of K-6 in Neosho and Allen counties. 202 was created along the existing county road betweem the new highway and the west city limits.1

It is uncertain at this point, but it is believed that upon the opening of the new alignment, K-6 was re-designated US 59

K-202 was withdrawn from the state highway system and turned over to Allen County on October 11, 2013.2

History Notes

1 Kansas Highway Commission Resolution For Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Neosho and Allen Counties 16 July 1958. Accessed 24 Oct. 2013

2 Kansas Department of Transportation Resolution To Withdraw K-202 in Allen County, Kansas 7 Oct. 2013. Accessed 24 Oct. 2013

Kansas Highway 203 (1958-2013)

Length: 0.633 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 59 west of Ellsmore, continues west as Deleware Road/RS 2
East Endpoint: Main Street in Ellsmore, continues east as a Deleware Road/RS 2
Counties Passed through: Allen

History

K-202 was designated by resolution dated July 16, 1958, alongside K-201 and K-203, as a result of the realignment of K-6 in Neosho and Allen counties. 203 was a former segment of K-6 between the north end of the new alignment and the intersection with Main Street in Ellsmore.1

It is uncertain at this point, but it is believed that upon the opening of the new alignment, K-6 was re-designated US 59

K-203 was withdrawn from the state highway system and turned over to Allen County on October 11, 2013.2

History Notes

1 Kansas Highway Commission Resolution For Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Neosho and Allen Counties 16 July 1958. Accessed 24 Oct. 2013

2 Kansas Department of Transportation Resolution To Withdraw K-203 in Allen County, Kansas 7 Oct. 2013. Accessed 24 Oct. 2013

Kansas Highway 204

Length: 2.1 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 36 west of Smith Center
East Endpoint: Junction US 281 in Smith Center
Counties Passed through: Smith

Kansas Highway 205 (1959-2014)

South Endpoint: North city limits of Milan
North Endpoint: Junction US 160 North of Milan, continues North as Milan Road
Counties Passed through: Sumner

Kansas Highway 206

South Endpoint: North City Limits of Chapman
North Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 286
Counties Passed through: Dickinson

Kansas Highway 207

South Endpoint: I-70/US 40 exit 298
North Endpoint: Junction US 40A at 6th and East Street, Junction City
Counties Passed through: Geary

Alternate Kansas Highway 207

West Endpoint: Junction US 40A at Washington and Chestnut, Junction City
East Endpoint: Junction K-207 at East and Chestnut Streets, Junction City
Counties Passed through: Geary

Kansas Highway 208 (1961-1967)

Length: 0.201 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-4 southeast of Valley Falls
North Endpoint: Junction K-16, Valley Falls
Counties Passed through: Jefferson

History

As part of the relocation of K-4 between Meriden and Valley Falls, the State Highway Commission determined there was a need to provide a connection between K-4 and K-16, as the planned junction between the two roadways was at an acute angle that otherwise proscribed movement from northbound K-4 into Valley Falls and vice versa. By a July 12, 1961 resolution, this connection was added to the system. The construction of Perry Lake necessitated the relocation of K-4 and K-16 east of Valley Falls. As a result, the junction between K-4 and K-16 in Valley Falls was re-aligned so that the roadways intersected at a right angle, and K-208 was deemed no longer necessary. By resolution date April 21, 1967, K-208, along with the bypassed segments of K-4 and K-16 in Valley Falls, was withdrawn from the state highway system.

Kansas Highway 209

Length: 2.5 miles
West Endpoint: Junction RS 1806 at west end of Woodbine, contines west as RS 192
East Endpoint: Junction US 77 South of Woodbine
Counties Passed through: Dickinson, Morris

Kansas Highway 210 (1959-2014)

South Endpoint: North city limits of Attica
North Endpoint: Junction US 160 North of Milan, continues North as Milan Road
Counties Passed through: Sumner

Kansas Highway 211

Length: 1 miles
South Endpoint: I-70/US 40 exit 99
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Park
Counties Passed through: Gove

Kansas Highway 212 (1959-2014)

Length: 0.6 miles
South Endpoint: I-70/US 40 exit 107
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Quinter
Counties Passed through: Gove

Kansas Highway 213

Southeast Endpoint: Junction K-13 near Tuttle Creek Dam
Northwest Endpoint: Junction US 77 South of Randolph
Counties Passed through: Riley

Kansas Highway 214

Length: 2 miles
North Endpoint: Junction US 75 north of Hoyt
South Endpoint: Junction US 75 south of Hoyt
Counties Passed through: Jackson

Kansas Highway 215

Length: 0.5 miles
East Endpoint: Junction K-15 east of Gosnell
West Endpoint: East City Limits of Gosnell
Counties Passed through: Marion

Kansas Highway 216

Length: 0.6 miles
South Endpoint: I-70/US 40 exit 85
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Grinell
Counties Passed through: Gove

Kansas Highway 217

Length: 0.5 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 5 miles East of St. Francis
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Wheeler
Counties Passed through: Cheyenne

Kansas Highway 218

Length: 1.8 miles
South Endpoint: Junction RS 5025/Walnut Street on west end of Herrington
North Endpoint: Junction K-4 northwest of Herrington
Counties Passed through: Dickinson

Kansas Highway 219 (1950-2013)

Length: 0.995 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-19 south of Seward
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Seward
Counties Passed through: Stafford

History

In 1946, the State Highway Commission relocate K-19 1 mile to the south, bypassing the towns of Radium and Seward. In March of 1949, the Commission agreed to build and maintain a spur to Seward if Stafford County agreed to acquire the right of way. In October of 1950, the county certified that they had acquired the ROW.

K-219 was removed from the state highway system and turned over to Stafford County on May 1, 2013.

Kansas Highway 221

Length: 0.2 miles
South Endpoint: North city limits of Soloman
North Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 266
Counties Passed through: Dickinson

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

47029
The former K-221 has been turned back to Dickinson County. A rectangular green patch has been affixed to all of the guide signs for the Solomon Road exit on I-70, causing the signs to become somewhat unbalanced. 20 July 2013

47030
The former K-221 has been turned back to Dickinson County. A rectangular green patch has been affixed to all of the guide signs for the Solomon Road exit on I-70, causing the signs to become somewhat unbalanced. 20 July 2013

47031
The former K-221 has been turned back to Dickinson County. A rectangular green patch has been affixed to all of the guide signs for the Solomon Road exit on I-70, causing the signs to become somewhat unbalanced. 20 July 2013

Kansas Highway 222

South Endpoint: Junction US 160 south of Mound Valley
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Mound Valley
Counties Passed through: Labette

Kansas Highway 223

South Endpoint: Junction K-23 7 miles east of Selden
North Endpoint: Junction K-383 3 miles southwest of Dresden
Counties Passed through: Sheridan, Decatur

Kansas Highway 224

Length: 1.039 miles
West Endpoint: East City Limits of Humboldt
East Endpoint: Junction US 169 east of Humboldt
Counties Passed through: Allen

History

K-224 was created in 1977 as a result of the relocation of US 169 on a new alignment to the east of Humboldt.[1]

K-224 was withdrawn from the state highway system and turned over to Allen County on October 11, 2013.[2]

History Notes

1 Kansas Department of Transportation Resolution For Relocation and Redesignation of Road in Allen County 26 Jan. 1977. Accessed 24 Oct. 2013

2 Kansas Department of Transportation Resolution To Withdraw K-224 in Allen County, Kansas 7 Oct. 2013. Accessed 24 Oct. 2013

Kansas Highway 225

Length: 0.5 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 81 , 47th and Broadway, Wichita
East Endpoint: I-135" 47th Street Interchange
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick

Kansas Highway 226

Length: 0.3 miles
West Endpoint: I-135" MacArthur Interchange
East Endpoint: Junction US 81 , MacArthur and Broadway, Wichita
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick

Kansas Highway 228

West Endpoint: Junction K-128 west of Ionia
East Endpoint: West City Limits of Ionia
Counties Passed through: Jewell

Kansas Highway 230

South Endpoint: Mount Hope
North Endpoint: Junction K-96 near Mount Hope
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick

Kansas Highway 231

Length: 0.7 miles
South Endpoint: Junction RS 2020/Old US 40 in Dorrance
North Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 199
Counties Passed through: Russell

Kansas Highway 232

South Endpoint: Junction RS 2020/Old US 40 in Wilson
North Endpoint: Junction K-18 southeast of Lucas
Counties Passed through: Ellsworth, Lincoln, Russell

Kansas Highway 233

West Endpoint: Junction US 77 8 miles north of Marysville
East Endpoint: Oketo
Counties Passed through: Marshall

Kansas Highway 234

West Endpoint: East City Limits of Hanover
East Endpoint: Junction K-148 east of Hanover
Counties Passed through: Washington

Interstate 235

South Endpoint: I-135 exit 1C
North Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 11, continues east as K-254
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

47183
Behind the exit gore for the ramp from I-135 north to I-235 north is a regular directional assembly. 20 July 2012

43957
The Overhead Gantry on the Kansas Turnpike/I-35 northbound at the exit for I-135, I-235, and US 81 in South Wichita. The overhead advisory speed plate is an unapproved use of the Clearview typeface. Clearview is approved only on light-on-dark colored signs. 4 June 2012

47127
Ahead of the junction of I-135 and I-235, there is a standard size junction assembly for K-96. 20 July 2013

47128
Here is the last overhead gantry before the exit from southbound I-135 to southbound I-235. The marker for K-96 is tucked off to the side. 20 July 2013

47142
The exit from southbound I-235 to Central Avenue consists of a "scissor ramp" to parallel Gilda Street. A sign at the end of the ramp directs traffic to turn left, along with a rather faded sign pointing out that drivers are entering a two-way street. 20 July 2012

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Kansas Highway 236

South Endpoint: Junction US 36 6 miles east of Seneca
North Endpoint: Oneida
Counties Passed through: Nemaha

Kansas Highway 237

Length: 3.4 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 24 west of Perry
North Endpoint: Perry Lake State Park
Counties Passed through: Jefferson

Kansas Highway 238

South Endpoint: Junction US 36 south of Elwood
North Endpoint: Missouri State Line, Browning Lake, Rosecrans Airport, St. Joseph
Counties Passed through: Doniphan

Kansas Highway 239

Length: 5.8 miles
West Endpoint: Junction US 69 west of Prescott
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line
Counties Passed through: Linn

Kansas Highway 241

West Endpoint: Kanapolis State Park
East Endpoint: Junction K-141 east of Kanapolis State Park
Counties Passed through: Ellsworth

Kansas Highway 243

West Endpoint: Junction K-143 northeast of Hanover
East Endpoint: Pony Express Station
Counties Passed through: Washington

Kansas Highway 244

Length: 3.9 miles
West Endpoint: Junction RS 270 south of Junction City, continues west as RS 200
East Endpoint: Junction US 77/K-57 northwest of Junction City
Counties Passed through: Geary

Spur Kansas Highway 244

Length: 0.8 miles
Southwest Endpoint: Junction K-244 south of Milford Dam
Northeast Endpoint: Junction K-57 south of Milford Dam
Counties Passed through: Geary

Kansas Highway 245 (1963-2013)

Length: 0.2 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-4 south of Meriden
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Meriden
Counties Passed through: Jefferson

Kansas Highway 246

Length: 6 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 75 in Sabetha
East Endpoint: Morill
Counties Passed through: Brown

Kansas Highway 247

Length: 0.1 miles
South Endpoint: North city limits of Ellis
North Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 145
Counties Passed through: Ellis

Kansas Highway 248

South Endpoint: Junction Old 36 in Kensington
North Endpoint: Junction US 36 north of Kensington
Counties Passed through: Smith

Kansas Highway 249

Length: 0.7 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-99 south of Madison
North Endpoint: Junction K-58, 4th and Lincoln, Madison
Counties Passed through: Greenwood

Kansas Highway 251

South Endpoint: Junction US 54-400 6 miles west of Garden Plain
North Endpoint: Cheney Reservoir
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick

Kansas Highway 252

Length: 0.5 miles
South Endpoint: North City Limits of Beverly
North Endpoint: Junction K-18 north of Beverly
Counties Passed through: Lincoln

Kansas Highway 253

Length: 0.7 miles
South Endpoint: I-70/US 24 exit 27
North Endpoint: Edson
Counties Passed through: Sherman

Kansas Highway 254

West Endpoint: I-135 exit 11/I-235 exit 16, continues west as I-235
East Endpoint: Junction US 54/77 in El Dorado.
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick, Butler

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

47299
This guide sign on the eastbound K-254 approach to the Kansas Turnpike at El Dorado uses "Turnpike" in lieu of a control city. 20 July 2013

47300
Here's a rather ugly K-254 shield. There are a handful of these signs around El Dorado. This one is at the junction with the turnpike on the west side of El Dorado.20 July 2013

Kansas Highway 255

South Endpoint: North city limits of Victoria
North Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 168 north of Victoria
Counties Passed through: Ellis

Kansas Highway 256

Northwest Endpoint: Junction US 56 northwest of Marion
Southeast Endpoint: Junction US 77 east of Marion
Counties Passed through: Marion

Kansas Highway 257

South Endpoint: I-70/US 40 exit 175
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Gorham
Counties Passed through: Russell

Kansas Highway 258

Length: 3.9 miles
South Endpoint: Webster Reservior
North Endpoint: Junction US 24 8 miles west of Stockton
Counties Passed through: Rooks

Kansas Highway 259

Length: 0.2 miles
South Endpoint: Junction K-16 south of Onage
North Endpoint: South City Limits of Onaga
Counties Passed through: Pottawatomie

Kansas Highway 260

Length: 3.6 miles
Southeast Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 46
Northwest Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 48
Counties Passed through: McPherson

Kansas Highway 261

Length: 1.2 miles
South Endpoint: Keith Sebilus Lake
North Endpoint: Junction US 36 4 miles west of Norton
Counties Passed through: Norton

Kansas Highway 263 (1971-1998)

Length: 0.6 miles
Northwest Endpoint: Junction Baptiste Drive and Hospital Drive in Paola
Southeast Endpoint: Junction US 169/K-7 southeast of Paola.
Counties Passed through: Miami

History

K-263 was created when the new US 169 2-lane freeway was completed by 1971.

K-263 was turned back to the City of Paola in 1998. The city had annexed out to US 169.

Kansas Highway 264

South Endpoint: Larned State Hospital
North Endpoint: Junction K-156 3 miles west of Larned
Counties Passed through: Pawnee

Kansas Highway 266

Length: 7.5 miles
South Endpoint: Junction US 36 12 miles west of Belleville
North Endpoint: Pawnee Indian Village
Counties Passed through: Republic

Kansas Highway 267

South Endpoint: I-70/US 24 exit 1
North Endpoint: Kanorado, on old US 24. Continues west as I-70 North Frontage Road
Counties Passed through: Sherman

Kansas Highway 268

West Endpoint: Junction US 75/K-31 north of Lyndon
East Endpoint: Junction K-68 north of Quenemo
Counties Passed through: Osage

Kansas Highway 269

South Endpoint: Junction US 169 south of Iola
North Endpoint: Junction US 54 east of Iola
Counties Passed through: Allen

US Highway 270

South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Liberal
North Endpoint: Junction US 54 in Liberal
Counties Passed through: Seward, Stevens, Grant, Stanton, Hamilton

Kansas Highway 271 (1967-2014)

Length: 0.657 miles
South Endpoint: North City limits of Mayfield
North Endpoint: Junction US 160 North of Mayfield
Counties Passed through: Sumner

Kansas Highway 273

South Endpoint: North city limits of Williamsburg
North Endpoint: I-35 exit 270
Counties Passed through: Franklin

Kansas Highway 274

Length: 0.416 miles
South Endpoint: South end of KSU Research Station south of Hays, continues south as RS 2009
North Endpoint: Junction Bypass US 183 South of Hays, continues North as Main Street
Counties Passed through: Ellis

History

K-274 was removed from the Kansas State Highway system and turned back to Ellis County on October 1, 2009.

Kansas Highway 276

Length: 1.4 miles
West Endpoint: Olivet
East Endpoint: Junction US 75 9 miles south of Lyndon
Counties Passed through: Osage

Kansas Highway 277 (1992-2013)

Length: 0.710 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-7 14 miles north of Girard
East Endpoint: BNSF Railway crossing, outside Crawford County State Lake
Counties Passed through: Crawford

History

K-277 was established out of an existing Crawford County road by resolution on April 24, 1992. A subsequent resolution clarified that the roadway was being established under KSA 68-406 (d), as a roadway connecting a state lake to the state highway system.

K-277 was turned back to Crawford County on June 1, 2013.

Kansas Highway 278

Length: 3 miles
West Endpoint: Melvern State Park
East Endpoint: Junction US 75 7 miles south of Lyndon
Counties Passed through: Osage

Kansas Highway 279

West Endpoint: Osawatomie State Hospital
East Endpoint: Junction US 169/K-7 northeast of Osawatomie
Counties Passed through: Miami

US Highway 281

A281
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Hardtner
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line south of Red Cloud, NE
Counties Passed through: Barber, Pratt, Stafford, Barton, Russell, Osbourne, Smith

US Highway 283

A283
Length: 216.9 miles
South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Englewood
North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line north of Norton
Counties Passed through: Clark, Ford, Hodgeman, Ness, Trego, Graham, Norton

US 283 Spur

South Endpoint: I-70/US 40 exit 128
North Endpoint: Junction US 283/Old US 40 at 13th and Barclay Ave., WaKeeney.
Counties Passed through: Trego

History

When I-70 was completed through WaKeeney, a segment of 13th Street from the junction with US 283 south to I-70 was brought into the state highway system as a spur of US 283. By 1984, this segment, along with US 283 from 13th and Barclay to I-70 at exit 127, was designated as Buisness 40.

Despite the designation, the route may have not been signed as a spur of US 283. Photos from Michael Summa dated 1986 posted at Steve Alpert's Alps' Roads indicate that the US 283 spur was marked as a Business loop of I-70.

Kansas Highway 284

Length: 5.6 miles
West Endpoint: Junction K-14 10 Miles North of Lincoln
East Endpoint: West City Limits of Barnard
Counties Passed through: Lincoln

Kansas Highway 285

South Endpoint: Junction K-10 south of Desoto. Continues west as 103rd Street/RS 2101
North Endpoint: South City Limits of DeSoto. Contiues north as Lexington Avenue/RS 2101
Counties Passed through: Johnson

Kansas Highway 292

West Endpoint: Junction K-92 east of Springdale
East Endpoint: Junction K-92 east of Springdale
Counties Passed through: Leavenworth

Kansas Highway 296

Northwest Endpoint: Junction K-96 east of Mount Hope
Southeast Endpoint: Junction K-96 near Maize
Counties Passed through: Sedgwick

Interstate 335

Length: 54.9 miles
Southwest Endpoint: I-35/Kansas Turnpike exit 127, Empoira
Northeast Endpoint: I-470/Kansas Turnpike exit 177, Topeka
Counties Passed through: Lyon, Wabaunsee, Osage, Shawnee

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

31965
A temporary orange diagrammatic sign directs the way to US 50 to Newton, or to the Turnpike and I-35 to Wichita or I-335 to Topeka. The new tollbooths are also in the shot. 10 November 2007

31967
Her's a shot of the new ramp from I-35 South to I-335 North in Emporia. 10 November 2007

31968
Here's a grab of a I-335 sign north of Emporia. As you can see, it is a stretched out version of the two digit shield, rather than a 3 digit shield. 10 November 2007

31975
The signs for I-470 at the South Topeka Interchange feature the stretched out 2 digit shield as well as the Clearview typeface. 10 November 2007

31976
The north end of I-335 at the I-470 interchange in Topeka. 10 November 2007

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US Highway 340 (proposed)

West Endpoint: Colorado state line west of Weskan
East Endpoint: Junction US 40 in Manhattan
Counties Passed through: Wallace, Logan, Gove, Trego, Ellis, Russell, Ellsworth, Saline, Dickinson, Geary, Riley

Kansas Highway 360

Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 160/K-15 east of Winfield
Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 77 South of Winfield
Counties Passed through: Cowley

Kansas Highway 368

South Endpoint: Junction K-268 South of Vassar State Park
North Endpoint: Vassar State Park
Counties Passed through: Osage

US Highway 383 (1926-1982)

Kansas Highway 383(1983-)
Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 83 northeast of Selden
Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 183 east of Wooddruff
Counties Passed through: Sheridan, Decatur, Norton, Phillips

US Highway 400

A400
Length: 454.9 miles
West Endpoint: Colorado State Line west of Coolidge
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line Baxter Springs
Counties Passed through: Hamilton, Kearney, Finney, Gray, Ford, Kiowa, Pratt, Kingman, Sedgwick, Butler, Greenwood, Wilson, Neosho, Montgomery, Labette, Cherokee

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

45842
The destination guide sign on eastbound US 166 at the junction with US 400 east of Baxter Springs uses the Junction with I-44 for the destination on eastbound US 166/400, and Parsons for westbound US 400.

47187
The guide sign for the Intrust Bank arena on Northbound I-135 directs traffic onto westbound Kellogg. The US 54 and US 400 shields on this sign has a inset border. 20 July 2012

47191
The advance guide sign for the interchange between I-135 and Kellogg (US 54-400) is a two-lane exit with an optional lane. On the reassurance assembly, US 81 and K-15 are both posted. On the exit guide sign, Kellogg Avenue is posted as 'Just Plain Kellogg.' 20 July 2013

47231
The exit guide sign for the K-96 exit with I-35 and 127th Street East (That is the full name of the road). The advance guide signs for the southeast end of the freeway at US 54-400 are a bit cramped... These signs pre-date the addition of US 400. 20 July 2013

47232
The east end of K-96 at Kellogg on the east side of Wichita. The signage pre-dates the introduction of US 400 and the truncation of K-96. Therefore, the signs are a bit crammed. 20 July 2013

Page 2-->

Interstate 435

A435
Length: 28 miles
Southeast Endpoint: Missouri State Line in Leawood
Northwest Endpoint: Missouri State Line on the Missouri River north of Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Johnson, Wyandotte

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

32242
The new overhead signs on I-435 at the US 69 interchange indicate two things: that the off-ramp from eastbound 435 to Antioch is immediately after the off-ramp for US 69, and that the last reference to US 169 on the guide signs for the Metcalf interchange has been removed.

32531
Here's a shot of the new ramp from southbound US 69 to I-435. It ramps upward towards a flyover. Note the sign for westbound 435 is exposed. 12 January 2008

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Here's the point where you need your final answer as to whether or not to exit onto US 69 or join I-435. 31 December 2008

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Just north of the Leavenworth Road interchange on I-435 is this guide sign for the next three exits: Donahoo Road, Wolcott Drive, and Route 45. "Route 45" is Missouri State Highway 45. Plans for replacement of this sign do feature a MO 45 shield. 24 February 2009

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North of the newly-built Donahoo Road interchange is this new sign on I-435 for Wolcott Drive, and Route 45. Not only is the MO 45 interchange spelled out again, but the interchange with NW Barry Road referenced on a previous sign has been eliminated. A new sign is slated to be installed with a MO 45 shield, but without a reference to Barry Road. 24 February 2009

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Interstate 470

Length: 11.3 miles
West Endpoint: I-70 exit 355, west of Topeka
East Endpoint: I-70/Kansas Turnpike exit 182/183 (East Topeka Interchange)
Counties Passed through: Shawnee

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

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The signs for I-470 at the South Topeka Interchange feature the stretched out 2 digit shield as well as the Clearview typeface. 10 November 2007

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The north end of I-335 at the I-470 interchange in Topeka. 10 November 2007

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This brown sign for the Brown v. Board National Historic Site is located on I-470 south of the East Topeka interchange, and advised drivers to double back west on I-70. The sign uses the "Clearview" typeface and has the logo of the National Park Service on the left side of the sign. 22 June 2009

Interstate 635

Length: 8.5 miles
South Endpoint: I-35 exit 231, Overland Park
North Endpoint: Missouri State Line on the Missouri River in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Johnson, Wyandotte

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

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On I-635 south of the K-32 interchange, the next three exits are K-32, I-70, and State Avenue. This sign was subsequently replaced as part of the removal of US 24 from State Avenue. 10 March 2009

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Here's an example of an optional lane. The far right hand lane has an "EXIT ONLY" panel, with a vertical line separating it from the "optional lane" that can either exit or continue on 635. This sign was replaced with a new one that removes the US 24 designation. The new State Ave. sign was photographed in Late May, 2009. 10 March 2009

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On I-635, this sign features two different state markers, K-5 and MO 9 10 March 2009

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Just before crossing the Missouri River and the State Line on I-635, the next three exits, including Missouri Hwy 9/US 69 and I-29/US 71, are on this sign.10 March 2009

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This guide sign just north of the Missouri River on southbound I-635 features exits for K-5 and Parallel Parkway in KCK. The detour sign for US 69 is posted because the Fairfax Bridge was closed at the time. 10 March 2009

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Interstate 670

Length: 1.3 miles
West Endpoint: I-70 exit 422C, Kansas City
East Endpoint: Missouri State Line in Kansas City
Counties Passed through: Wyandotte

Photos

Clicking on a photograph takes you to the photo's flickr page

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Here we have *five* markers on this junction assembly. In close order, Central Avenue intersects with both I-70 and I-670. In addition, I-70 carries US 24, US 40, and US 169 along this stretch. 26 May 2013