Kansas Highways: Number 60-79

K-60K-61K-62K-63K-64
K-65K-65|(1926)K-66K-67K-68
US 69US 69AUS 69B (Pittsburg)US 69B (Arma)US 69B
(Fort Scott)
K-69I-70K-70K-71K-72
US 73US 73EUS 73WUS 73 TruckK-74
US 75US 75B
(Altoona)
US 75 Bypass
(Topeka)
K-76US 77
US 77B
(Ark City)
US 77B
(Herrington)
US 77B
(Junction City)
K-78K-79

K-60

Length: 4.284 miles

South Endpoint: Junction US 36 southeast of Almena

North Endpoint: Junction K-383 near Almena

County Served: Norton

AADT: 105 (19.0% Truck)

History

K-60 was added to the State Highway system in 1927. The number was assigned in sequence. The route was graded and graveled by 1930 and blacktopped by 1947.


K-61

Length: 83.343 miles

Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 54-400 east of Pratt

Northeast Endpoint: I-135/US 81 exit 58, McPherson

Counties Served: Pratt, Reno, McPherson


K-62

Length: 13.339 miles

South Endpoint: Junction K-16 south of Soldier

North Endpoint: Junction K-9 near Goff

Counties Served: Jackson, Nemaha

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
62-43/0.0000.000K-16 (begin K-62)
62-43/4.6524.652South city limits Soldier
62-43/5.3905.390North city limits Soldier
62-43/7.309
62-66/0.000
7.309Jackson/Nemaha county line
62-66/6.03013.339K-9 (end K-62)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
K-16 to Soldier38010.5%
In Soldier31512.7%
Soldier to K-923017.4%

K-63

Length: 58.769 miles

South Endpoint: Junction US 24 in St. Marys

North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line south of Dubois, NE

Counties Served: Pottawatomie, Nemaha


K-64

Length: 3.574 miles

Historic Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 281 south of Pratt

Historic Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 54-400 east of Pratt

Historic County Served: Pratt (1927-2015)

History

K-64 was designated in 1927 to serve the headquarters of the Fish and Game Commission. The number was assigned in sequence. The route was gravel by 1936 and hard surfaced by 1937.

K-64 was removed from the state highway system July 10, 2015. Pratt County agreed to take over the highway in consideration for widening US 54400 east of Pratt to a 4-lane expressway. The headquarters of the Fish and Game Commission is now known as the operations office of its successor, the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism.

As of April 2017, it is the most recent highway to be turned back in its entirety.


K-65

Length: 11.2 miles

West Endpoint: Junction K-3 west of Xenia

East Endpoint:
Junction K-31 north of Xenia (1936-1957)
Junction K-31 in Mapleton (1957-present)

Counties Served: Bourbon

History

K-65 was re-numbered from K-69 in 1936 to make way for US 69. The number was a ‘backfill’ assignment as the lowest number available.

The highway was gravel until 1957, when K-65 was reconstructed on a new blacktop alignment, with the new alignment continuing east from Xenia to Mapleton instead of turning north at Xenia.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
65-6/0.0000.000K-3 (begin K-65)
65-6/10.60210.602South city limits Mapleton
65-6/11.16011.160K-31 (end K-65)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
K-3 to MP 81307.7%
MP 8 to Mapleton16012.5%
South city limits Mapleton to K-3117537.1%

K-65 (1926-1934)

Historic South Endpoint: Junction US 36 south of Lebanon

Historic North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line south of Red Cloud, NE

Historic County Served: Smith (1926-1934)

History

The first K-65 was re-designated as part of US 281 in 1934.


K-66

Previously designated: US 66 (1926-1985)

Length: 5.527 miles

West Endpoint:
Oklahoma State line, Baxter Springs (As US 66, 1926-1985)
Junction US 69A400 west of Riverton (1985-)

East Endpoint:
Missouri State Line east of Galena, continues east as MO 66

County Served: Cherokee

History

Generally, the mother road has remained as it is now, cutting a corner in the southeast corner of Kansas in Cherokee County. When US 66 was first designated in 1926, the segment form Baxter Springs north and east to Missouri was hard surfaced, with the remainder of the route to the south remaining a dirt road. The dirt segment was graveled by 1928 and paved by 1929.

In 1960, The Riverton-Baxter Springs segment was realigned to the east. At some point (possibly around the same time), US 66 was moved from Front Street to 7th Street in Galena, with a new roadway running diagonally to 7th Street in Joplin, Missouri.

The elimination of what was left of US 66 from Joplin west to Sanders, Arizona was approved by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials on June 26, 1985. At the same time, a new route, US 69 Alternate was designated, replacing US 66 south and west of Riverton. The remainder of the road east of Riverton was re-designated as K-66.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
66-11/0.0000.000US 69A/US 400 (begin K-66)
66-11/3.6823.682West city limits Galena
66-11/4.2664.266K-26
66-11/5.5275.527Missouri state line (end K-66)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
US 69A/US 400 to Galena9,5704.6%
West city limits Galena to K-2610,1004.4%
K-26 to Missouri State line11,3005.4%

K-67

Length: 0.972 mile

South Endpoint:
Junction US 36 east of Norton

North Endpoint:
County road 1 mile north of US 36 Junction

Counties Served: Norton

AADT: 435 (8.0% truck)

History

This spur route was established in 1927 to serve what was then known as Norton State Tuberculosis Sanatorium. The road was paved in 1954 and reconstructed in 1968.

The former hospital now serves as Norton Correctional Facility.


K-68

Length: 61.517 miles

West Endpoint:
Junction K-33 south of Wellsville (1927-1936)
Junction US 75/K-31 south of Lyndon (1936-present)

East Endpoint:
Junction US 69 in Louisburg (1927-1936)
MO 2 at the Missouri State Line east of Louisburg (1936-present)

Counties Served: Osage, Franklin, Miami


US 69

Length: 163.545 miles

South Endpoint:
Oklahoma State Line south of Columbus

North Endpoint: Missouri State Line in Kansas City

Counties Served:
Cherokee, Crawford, Bourbon, Linn, Miami, Johnson, Wyandotte

(More…)


US 69A

Length: 13.031 miles

South Endpoint:
Oklahoma State Line, south of Baxter Springs

North Endpoint:
Junction US 69-160-400 north of Crestline

Counties Served: Cherokee

History:

As part of the withdrawal of US 66 as a US numbered highway, the states of Oklahoma and Kansas jointly submitted a proposal to re-designate a portion of the former route as an alternate route of US 69, which was subsequently approved by AASHTO.

US 69A replaced US 66 from the Oklahoma state line to the former west junction of US 66 and K-26 west of Galena, then replaced K-26 north to US 69 at Crestline.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
69A-11/0.0000.000Oklahoma state line (Begin K-68)
69A-11/0.4830.483South city limits Baxter Springs
69A-11/1.8011.801US 166
69A-11/3.0993.099North city limits Baxter Springs
69A-11/3.980
400-11/40.494
3.980US 400
400-11/38.7275.747K-66 (roundabout)
400-11/31.44313.031US 69 (end US 69A)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
Oklahoma State line to SCL Baxter Springs6,3809.2%
South city limits Baxter Springs to US 16611,0005.8%
US 166 to north city limits Baxter Springs7,69010.5%
North city limits Baxter Springs to US 4006,14012.6%
US 400 from S. junction US 400/US 69A to K-667,53010.1%
US 400 from K-66 to US 69A MP 106,77011.8%
US 400 from US 69A MP 10 to US 696,00013.8%

US 69B (Pittsburg)

Previously designated: US 69A (1957-1981)

Length: 4.141 miles

South Endpoint: Junction US 69 south of Pittsburg

North Endpoint: Junction US 69 north of Pittsburg

Counties Served: Crawford

History:

When the US 69 bypass around Pittsburg was designated in 1955, the old alignment through Pittsburg. was retained as an alternate route. The bypass was completed in 1957.

The State Highway Commission never sought the inclusion of this route, among others, as part of the US Highway system. After the Highway Commission was reformed into the Kansas Department of Transportation, KDOT submitted this route for approval as a Alternate route of US 69. At AASHTO’s October 13, 1979 meeting, they approved the designation, but requested that the designation be changed from an Alternate route to a business route. KDOT implemented the banner change from “Alternate” to “Business” in April 1981.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
69B-19/0.0000.000South junction US 69
(Begin US 69B, Pittsburg)
69B-19/0.0390.039South city limits Pittsburg
69B-19/0.0980.098Broadway/Centennial
69B-19/1.1041.104Broadway/Quincy
69B-19/2.1142.114Broadway/4th/K-126
69B-19/3.1273.127Broadway/20th
69B-19/4.1414.141North junction US 69
(end US 69B, Pittsburg)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
South junction US 69 to Broadway/Centennial7,3404.3%
Broadway from Centennial to Quincy7,1103.4%
Broadway from Quincy to 4th Street/K-1268,2802.8%
Broadway from 4th Street/K-126 to 20th Street8,0305.5%
Broadway from 20th Street to
North Junction US 69
12,5003.8%

US 69B (Arma)

Previously designated: US 69A (1961-1981)

Length: 2.988 miles

South Endpoint: Junction US 69/K-47 south of Arma.

North Endpoint: Junction US 69 north of Arma.

Counties Served: Crawford

History:

When the US 69 bypass around Arma was established in 1960, the original plan was to withdraw the old alignment through Arma. In late 1961, the State Highway Commission reversed course and chose to retain the old alignment as a alternate route.

The State Highway Commission never sought the inclusion of this route, among others, as part of the US Highway system. After the Highway Commission was reformed into the Kansas Department of Transportation, KDOT submitted this route for approval as a Alternate route of US 69. At AASHTO’s October 13, 1979 meeting, they approved the designation, but requested that the designation be changed from an Alternate route to a business route. KDOT implemented the banner change from “Alternate” to “Business” in April 1981.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
69B-19/0.0000.000South junction US 69
(Begin US 69B, Arma)
69B-19/1.1601.1602nd Street, Franklin
69B-19/1.9091.909South city limits Arma
69B-19/2.1602.160South Street
69B-19/2.4852.485Palmer Street
69B-19/2.6742.674North city limits Arma
69B-19/2.9882.988North junction US 69
(end US 69B, Arma)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
South junction US 69 to 2nd Street, Franklin1,7405.7%
2nd Street, Franklin to South Street, Arma1,5906.3%
South Street to Palmer Street1,7905.6%
Palmer Street to North Junction US 6961016.4%

US 69B (Fort Scott)

South Endpoint:
Junction US 69/K-7, South National Avenue and Main Street, Fort Scott

North Endpoint:
Junction US 54/US 69/K-7 at Wall Street, Fort Scott

Counties Served: Bourbon

History:

When a new alignment for US 69 was established through Fort Scott in 1967, the city of Fort Scott signed the former alignment along National Avenue as a Business Route. Unlike the Arma and Pittsburg business routes, this route was never officially designated by either the State Highway Commission, KDOT, or AASHTO.

By 1990, Fort Scott elected to discontinue signing the business route.


K-69

Historic West Endpoint: Junction K-3 west of Xenia

Historic East Endpoint: Junction K-38 north of Xenia

Historic Counties Served: Bourbon (1927-1936)

History:

K-69 was added to the State Highway system in 1927. The number was assigned in sequence. It was renumbered at K-65 in 1936 in order to free up the number for the extension of US 69 into Kansas.


I-70

Length: 423.753 miles

West Endpoint: Colorado State Line near Kanorado

East Endpoint: Missouri State Line on the Lewis and Clark Viaduct in Kansas City

Counties Served:
Sherman, Thomas, Logan, Gove, Trego, Ellis, Russell, Lincoln, Ellsworth, Saline, Dickinson, Geary, Riley, Wabaunsee, Shawnee, Douglas, Leavenworth, Wyandotte

(More…)


K-70

Historic Southwest Endpoint:
K-99 west of Reading (1927-1957)

Historic Northeast Endpoint:
West City Limits of Reading (1927-1945)
K-31 is Osage City (1946-1957)

Historic Counties Served:
Lyon (1927-1957), Osage (1945-1957)

History

K-70 was added to the State Highway system in 1927 as a spur from K-11 to Reading. The number was assigned in sequence. The route was graded and graveled by 1928. In 1935, Osage County graded and graveled a road connecting Reading with Osage City. The State Highway Commission accepted the route as an extension of K-70 in 1945. The entire route was blacktopped by 1947.

K-70 was re-designated as K-170 on October 31, 1957, in order to free up the number for use as Interstate 70.


K-71

Length: 4.581 miles

West Endpoint: K-63 north of Seneca

East Endpoint: South City Limits of Bern

Counties Served: Nemaha

AADT (2019): 775 (9.0% truck)


K-72

Historic South Endpoint: Junction US 2440 South of Basehor

Historic North Endpoint: South City Limits of Basehor

Historic Counties Served: Leavenworth (1927-1978)

History

K-72 was added to the State Highway system in 1927 as a spur from US 40 to Basehor. The number was assigned in sequence. The route was paved from the outset. In 1947, the south end shifted south when US 24-40 was moved from Parallel Road to State Avenue.

K-72 was removed from the state highway system upon the passage of the 1978 legislature’s Proposal No. 61, which disallowed intra-city highways.


US 73

Length: 90.096 miles

South Endpoint:
Oklahoma State Line South of Chetopa (south segment 1927-1935)
US 73W/US 73E in Horton (north segment 1927-1935)
Missouri State Line in Downtown Kansas City (1935-1982)
Junction US 2440, Bonner Springs (1982-1988)
I-435 exit 13, Kansas City (1988-2009)
I-70 exit 224 in Bonner Springs (2009-)

North Endpoint:
US 73W/US 73E/K-96 in Oswego (South segment 1927-1935)
Nebraska State Line south of Falls City, Neb.
(North segment 1927-1935; 1935-present)

Counties Served: Wyandotte, Leavenworth, Atchison, Brown

Historic County Served: Labette (1927-1935)


US 73E

Historic South Endpoint:
Junction US 73W/US 73/K-96 at Oswego

Historic North Endpoint:
Junction US 73W/73 at Horton

Historic Counties Served:
Labette, Cherokee, Crawford, Bourbon, Linn, Miami, Johnson, Wyandotte, Leavenworth, Atchison, Brown (1927-1935)


US 73W

Historic South Endpoint:
Junction US 73/US 73E/K-96 at Oswego

Historic North Endpoint: Junction US 73/US 73E at Horton

Historic Counties Served:
Labette, Neosho, Allen, Anderson, Franklin, Douglas, Jefferson, Atchison, Brown (1927-1935)

(More…)


US 73 Truck Route (Leavenworth)

Historic South Endpoint: 4th and Spruce, Leavenworth

Historic North Endpoint: 4th and Pawnee, Leavenworth

Historic County Served: Leavenworth

History:

From at least the 1980s until 2017, 4th Street through Downtown Leavenworth carried a truck prohibition, despite the fact that the street was the City Connecting Link for US 73/K-7/K-92. The City designated 3rd Street as the main truck route through the area and signed the route accordingly. The truck route was not considered a city connecting link, the route was signed and maintained at the sole expense of the City of Leavenworth.

By April, 2017, the truck prohibition was removed from 4th Street, and the truck route signage was removed.


K-74

Length: 3.440 miles

Historic West Endpoint: Intersection with Rawlins Road, Potter

Historic East Endpoint: Junction US 73/K-7 east of Potter

Historic Counties Served: Atchison (1927-2013)

History

K-74 was added to the State Highway system in 1927 as a spur from US 73E to Potter. The number was assigned in sequence. It was graveled by 1930 and hard surfaced by 1936. The road was turned over to Atchison County for unknown consideration in December of 2013


US 75

Length: 228.161 miles

South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Caney

North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line north of Sabetha

Counties Served:
Montgomery, Wilson, Woodson, Coffey, Osage, Shawnee, Jackson, Brown, Nemaha

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US 75 Business (Altoona)

Length: 1.627 miles

South Endpoint: Junction US 75 south of Altoona.

North Endpoint: Junction US 75 north of Altoona.

County Served: Wilson

History

In 1965, a new alignment of US 75 was constructed near Altoona. The new route included a bypass to the east of Altoona with new connections to Quincy Street in Altoona on the north and south side. Originally, US 75 remained routed on Quincy Street, with the Bypass route signed as a bypass route.

The State Highway Commission never sought the inclusion of the bypass, among others, as part of the US Highway system. After the Highway Commission was reformed into the Kansas Department of Transportation, KDOT applied to move the US 75 designation to the bypass and to designated the Quincy Street alignment route as a alternate route. At AASHTO’s October 13, 1979 meeting, they approved the change, but requested that the designation of the Quincy Street route be changed from an alternate route to a business route. KDOT implemented the changes to US 75 through Altoona in April 1981.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
75B-103/0.0000.000South junction US 75 (begin US 75B)
75B-103/0.1790.179South city limits Altoona
75B-103/1.1844.266K-47
75B-103/1.3901.390North city limits Altoona
75B-103/1.6271.627North junction US 75 (end US 75B)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
South junction US 75 to K-4731512.7%
K-47 to north junction US 7535532.4%

US 75 Bypass (Topeka)

Historic South Endpoint: US 75 in South Topeka

Historic North Endpoint: US 75/US 24 in North Topeka

Historic County Served: Shawnee (1965-1998)

History

In 1965, a new alignment of US 75 was constructed between Topeka and Hoyt. In conjunction with the opening of the new route, the State Highway Commission petitioned AASHO to designate a new Bypass route of US 75 via I-470, Wanamaker Road, I-70, the Westgate Bridge, and US 24. The bypass route was approved at AASHO’s October 1965 meeting.

In 1976, in conjuction with the addition of the second Westgate Bridge, the road between the bridge and US 24 was widened to four lanes and re-aligned to tie directly in to US 75.

In 1997, in conjunction with the opening of a new US 75 south of Topeka, KDOT applied to re-designate the US 75 bypass as the US 75 mainline. After an initial rejection in November 1997 and request for clarification, AASHTO approved the change in April 1998


K-76

Length: 0.325 miles

Historic South Endpoint: Railroad Street in Williamstown

Historic North Endpoint: Junction US 2459 north of Williamstown

Historic County Served: Jefferson (1926-2013)

History

K-76 was added to the State Highway system in 1927 as a spur from US 73W to Williamstown. The number was assigned in sequence. It was paved in 1927 as part of the paving of US 73W east of Williamstown. The road was turned over to Jefferson County for cash consideration on January 3, 2014.


US 77

Length: 241.260 miles

South Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line south of Arkansas City

North Endpoint: Nebraska State Line (CG/JJW) north of Marysville

Counties Served:
Cowley, Butler, Marion, Dickinson, Morris, Geary, Riley, Marshall

(More…)


US 77B (Arkansas City)

Length: 4 miles

Historic South Endpoint:
Junction US 77/166 at Madison Avenue and Summit Street, Arkansas City

Historic North Endpoint: Junction US 77 north of Arkansas City

Historic County Served: Cowley (1997-2005)

History

In 1997, a new US 77 bypass of Arkansas City was completed. KDOT applied with AASHTO to relocate US 77 and establish a business route on the old alignment, which was approved at their April 1998 meeting.

Arkansas City agreed to a turnback of US 77B in consideration of the completion of the bypass. AASHTO approved of the elimination of US 77B in May of 2008.


US 77B (Herrington)

Previously designated: US 77 Alternate (1962-1981)

Historic Southwest Endpoint:
Junction US 5677 south of Herington, concurrent with US 56B

Historic Northeast Endpoint:
Junction US 56–77 east of Herington, concurrent with US 56B

Historic County Served:
Dickinson (1962-1990)

History

In 1960, a bypass was built around the east side of Herrington and was designated US 56US 77. The old alignment of US 56 through Herrington was re-designated as an alternate route for both US 56 and US 77. The State Highway Commission never sought the inclusion of this route, among others, as part of the US Highway system. After the Highway Commission was reformed into the Kansas Department of Transportation, KDOT submitted this route for approval as a alternate route of US 56 and US 77. AASHTO approved the request as a business loop at their October 1979 meeting. KDOT would issue a resolution implementing the change in April 1981.

In December of 1990, KDOT issued a resolution removing the US 77B designation, leaving the route solely as a Business route of US 56.


US 77B (Junction City)

Previously designated: US 77 Alternate (1959-1981)

Historic South Endpoint:
US 77 south of Junction City, concurrent with I-70/US 40/K-18

Historic North Endpoint:
Junction US 77 north of Junction City, concurrent with K-57

Historic County Served: Geary (1959-1988)

History

In 1959, a new alignment for US 77 was completed west of Junction City. The old alignment through Junction City was retained as an alternate route.

he State Highway Commission never sought the inclusion of this route, among others, as part of the US Highway system. After the Highway Commission was reformed into the Kansas Department of Transportation, KDOT submitted this route for approval as a alternate route of US 77. AASHTO approved the request as a business loop at their October 1979 meeting. KDOT would issue a resolution implementing the change in April, 1981.

The entire length of this US 77B was concurrent with other routes, mainly I-70, US 40B, and K-57. In 1988, KDOT issued a resolution removing the US 77B markers from the route.


K-78

Length: 1.057 miles

South Endpoint: Former north city limits of Miller

North Endpoint: US 56 north of Miller

County Served: Lyon

AADT (2019): 175 (22.9% truck)

History

K-78 was added to the State Highway system in 1927 as a spur from US 50N to Miller. The number was assigned in sequence. It was graded and blacktopped by 1931.


K-79

Length: 3.561 miles

South Endpoint: Junction K-16 west of Holton

North Endpoint: South City Limits of Circleville

County Served: Jackson

AADT (2019): 675 (8.8% truck)

History

K-79 was added to the State Highway system in 1927 as a spur from K-16 to Circleville. The number was assigned in sequence.

The original route followed an alignment one mile to the west of the current route. The current alignment was completed in 1940 and blacktopped by 1946.