Kansas Highways: Numbers 40-59

US 40US 40NUS 40SUS 40B
(Wakeeney)
US 40A
(Hays)
US 40B
(Russell)
US 40B
(Junction City)
US 40 Spur
(Topeka)

K-41K-41 (1926)
K-42K-43K-44K-45K-46
K-47K-48K-48 (1926)K-49US 50
US 50NUS 50SUS 50B
(Dodge City)
US 50 Spur
(Garden City)
US 50B
(Garden City)
US 50A
(Dodge City)
US 50B (Ottawa)K-51K-52K-52
(1926)
K-53US 54K-55US 56US 56B
K-56 (1926)K-56
(1937)
K-57K-58K-58
(1926)
K-59US 59

US 40

Length: 433.307 miles

West Endpoint:
Junction US 40N/US 40S, Manhattan (1926-1935)
Colorado State Line west of Weskan (1935-present)

East Endpoint:
Missouri State Line in Kansas City

Counties Served:
Wallace, Logan, Gove, Trego, Ellis, Russell, Lincoln, Ellsworth, Saline, Dickinson, Geary, Riley, Wabaunsee, Shawnee, Douglas, Leavenworth, Wyandotte

Historical Counties Served:
Pottawatomie (1926-1957)

More…


US Highway 40N

West Endpoint:
Colorado State Line near Kanorado

East Endpoint:
Junction US 40/US 40S, Manhattan

Historic Counties Served:
Sherman, Thomas, Sheridan, Graham, Rooks, Osbourn, Mitchell, Cloud, Clay, Riley (1926-1935)

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US Highway 40S

West Endpoint:
Colorado state line west of Weskan

East Endpoint:
Junction US 40/US 40N, Manhattan

Historical Counties Served:
Wallace, Logan, Gove, Trego, Ellis, Russell, Ellsworth, Saline, Dickinson, Geary, Riley (1926-1935)

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US 40B (WaKeeney)

Length: 2.187 miles

West Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 127

East Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 128

County Served: Trego

History

As part of the June 1979 AASHTO actions regarding US highways in Kansas, AASHTO approved this route as a Business route of US 40. Previously, it had been mapped as a Spur of US 283 and marked as a Business loop of I-70.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
283-98/21.9750.000West junction I-70/US 40
(begin US 40B concurrent with US 283)
283-98/22.4390.4641st Street/Barclay Avenue, WaKeeney
283-98/23.440
40B-98/1.465
1.46513th Street/Barclay Avenue
(US 40B leaves US 283)
40B-98/2.1872.187East Junction I-70/US 40 (end US 40B)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
On First Street in Wakeeney2,87014.6%
On Barclay Avenue in Wakeeney2,66015.8%
On 13th Street in Wakeeney2,05017.6%

US 40 Alternate (Hays)

West Endpoint: Junction US 40 west of Hays

East Endpoint: Junction US 40 east of Hays

Historic County Served: Ellis (1953-1963)

History

In 1953, a new bypass around the south side of Hays was established by the State Highway Commission. The new bypass received the US 40 designation. The old US 40 through Hays was retained as an Alternate route.

In 1963, I-70 was designated from Ogallah to Hays. As part of the designation, the old Alternate US 40 was removed and the previously constructed bypass became part of a bypass route of US 183.


US 40B (Russell)

Previously Designated: US 40A (1967-1981)

Length: 6.092 miles

Historic West Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 184

Historic East Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 189

Historic County Served: Russell (1967-2013)

History

The Russell business loop was created in 1967 from the old US 40 alignment.

The State Highway Commission never sought the inclusion of this route, among others, as part of the US Highway system. After the Highway Commission was reformed into the Kansas Department of Transportation, KDOT submitted this route for approval as a Business Loop of I-70 and a Alternate route of US 40. AASHTO rejected the I-70 business loop request and approved the US 40 request as a business loop at their June 1979 meeting. KDOT implemented the banner change from “Alternate” to “Business” in April 1981.

The route was turned back to the City of Russell and to Russell County in 2013 for unknown consideration.


US 40B (Junction City)

Previously Designated: US 40A (1967-1981)

Length: 4.023 miles

West Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 296

East Endpoint: I-70/US 40 Exit 300

County Served: Geary

History

The Junction City business loop was created in 1967 using Washington Street (the former US 40/US 77) and 6th Street (K-57).

The State Highway Commission never sought the inclusion of this route, among others, as part of the US Highway system. After the Highway Commission was reformed into the Kansas Department of Transportation, KDOT submitted this route for approval as a Business Loop of I-70 and a Alternate route of US 40. AASHTO rejected the I-70 business loop request and approved the US 40 request as a business loop at their June 1979 meeting. KDOT implemented the banner change from “Alternate” to “Business” in April 1981.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
40B-31/0.0000.000West junction I-70/US 40/K-18
(begin US 40B)
40B-31/0.0930.093South City limits Junction City
40B-31/1.5201.5206th Street/Washington Street/K-57
(K-57 joins US 40B)
40B-31/2.3612.361East City limits Junction City
40B-31/2.8682.868West city limits Grandview Plaza
40B-31/4.0234.023East Junction I-70/US 40/K-18
(end US 40B, continue K-57)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
On Washington Street7,4708.0%
6th Street/Washington Street to
East City limits Junction City
6,3904.2%
In Grandview Plaza1,95015.9%

US 40 Spur (Topeka)

South Endpoint: Kansas Turnpike East Topeka Interchange (Exit 9/183)

North Endpoint: Junction US 40 (6th Ave and Deer Creek Trafficway)

Historic County Served: Shawnee (1956-1986)

History

Originally built as the connection between US 40 (6th Avenue) and the Kansas Turnpike’s East Topeka interchange, its fate was intertangled with the construction of I-70. When I-70 was completed in the area, I-70 traffic had to exit from the Turnpike onto the access road, then exit off the access road to continue on I-70, while eastbound traffic had to likewise. The I-70 freeway was originally planned to be extended east to directly connect to US 40, and eventually to the proposed as the Deer Creek expressway. By 1986, the interchange between I-70 and the access road was reconfigured so that the I-70 mainline connected directly into the East Topeka interchange. The remainder of the East Topeka access road north of I-70 was turned back and partially removed.


K-41

Length: 4.960 miles

West Endpoint: East City Limits of Delphos

East Endpoint: Junction US 81 east of Delphos

County Served: Ottawa

AADT (2019): 545 (16.5% truck)

History:

The spur from US 81 to Delphos was brought into the state system in 1937. The route was graded by Ottawa county to state standards and was quickly blacktopped. The number was a “backfill” designation, as the previous K-41 had been re-designated.


K-41 (1926-1937)

South Endpoint: Junction US 160 near Protection

North Endpoint:
Junction US 54 in Bucklin (1926-1933)
Junction US 154 North of Bucklin (1933-1937)

Historic Counties Served: Comanche, Clark, Ford (1926-1937)

History:

The highway from Protection to Bucklin was originally numbered K-41 in the final version of the original highway numbering plan as part of a rough clustering pattern for shorter route segments.

When a new route from Sitka to the Oklahoma border in Clark County was opened, it, along with K-41, was designated as K-34


K-42

Length: 79.947 miles

West Endpoint:
Junction US 281 in Sawyer

East Endpoint:
I-235 exit 5, Wichita (2001-present)

Counties Served: Pratt, Barber, Kingman, Sumner, Sedgwick


K-43

Length: 20.718 miles

South Endpoint: Junction K-4 at Hope

North Endpoint: I-70 exit 281

County Served: Dickinson

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
43-21/0.0000.000K-4 (begin K-43)
43-21/15.82415.824East city limits Enterprise
43-21/16.88316.883North city limits Enterprise
43-21/18.72118.240West junction old US 40
43-21/19.29319.293East junction old US 40
43-21/20.71820.718I-70/US 40 (end K-43)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
K-4 to MP 745512.1%
MP 7 to MP 99101.1%
MP 9 to MP 121907.9%
MP 13 to Enterprise29513.6%
In Enterprise1,7506.6%
Enterprise to MP 182,3005.0%
MP 18 to old US 401,5305.2%
On old US 401,7005.0%
Old US 40 to I-7059014.4%

K- 44

Length: 25 miles

West Endpoint: Junction K-2 in Anthony

East Endpoint: Junction K-49 north of Caldwell

Counties Served: Harper, Sumner

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
44-39/0.0000.000K-2, Anthony(Begin K-42)
44-39/0.5050.505K-179
44-39/1.2911.291East city limits Anthony
44-39/13.079
44-96/0.000
13.079Harper/Sumner county line
44-96/11.59524.674K-49 (end K-44)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
K-2 to K-1794,1907.6%
K-179 to East city limits Anthony3,1704.6%
Anthony to MP 468519.7%
MP 4 to MP 1537036.5%
MP 15 to MP 2045030.0%
MP 20 to K-4953025.5%

K-45

Historic Southwest Endpoint:
K-27 at Elkhart (1926-1939; west segment 1939-1956)
K-4 near Bushton (east segment 1939-1956, 1956-1957)
US 56 east of Great Bend (1957-1966)

Historic Northeast Endpoint:
US 50S at Dodge City (1926-1937)
US 50N/K-96 at Great Bend (1937-1939, west segment 1939-1956)
Junction US 40 at Ellsworth (east segment 1939-1957; 1957-1966)

Historic Counties Served:
Morton, Stevens, Haskell, Gray, Ford (1926-1956)
Edwards, Pawnee (1938-1956)
Barton, Ellsworth (1938-1966)


K-46

Length: 1.315 miles

Historic South Endpoint: Junction US 56 south of Little River

Historic North Endpoint: South City Limits of Little River

Historic County Served: Rice (1933-2013)

History

The spur connecting US 50N and Little River first appeared on the 1933 State Highway Map. No numerical designation appeared on the map for this short spur; however, the 1940 Rice County Highway Map does show the road as designated K-46.

K-46 was removed from the state highway system and turned over to Rice County on June 3, 2013.


K-47

Length: 61 miles

West Endpoint:
Junction K-39/K-96 in Fredonia (1927-1937; 1953-1999)
Junction K-96 north of New Albany (1937-1953)
East City Limits of Fredonia (de jure)/Junction US 400 east of Fredonia (de facto) (1999-present)

East Endpoint:
Junction US 75 near Buffalo (1927)
Junction US 169 north of Thayer (1928-1946)
Junction US 59 west of St. Paul (1946-2003)
Junction US 69 near Franklin (2003-present)

Counties Served: Wilson, Neosho, Crawford


K-48

Length: 0.775 miles

Historic South Endpoint: North City Limits of Atchison

Historic North Endpoint: Youth Center at Atchison

Historic Counties Served: Atchison (1939-1978)

History

This roadway was designated by a state resolution in 1939, from what was then the intersection of North 3rd and “P” Street, then north along Third, cutting diagonally to Second, then turning east on what is today designated 298th Street in Atchison County, then east 876 feet, then north 455 feet, to the main Administration building of the Kansas Orphans Home.

This highway was never shown on state-level maps, but was shown on the Atchison County maps through 1978. I presume that this route was eliminated along with the other intra-city routes when the 1978 legislature’s “Proposal 61” went into effect. By 1978, the Orphans’ Home had become a juvenile detention facility known as the Youth Center at Atchison.

The ‘Orphans Home Road’ is also an orphan highway, since it did not connect to any other state route.


K-48 (1927)

Historic West Endpoint: Junction K-7 in Mound City

Historic East Endpoint: Junction US 73E south of Pleasanton

Historic Counties Served: Linn (1927-1937)

History

The highway from Mound City to Pleasanton was originally numbered K-48 in the final version of the original highway numbering plan as part of a rough clustering pattern for shorter route segments.

It was combined with K-56, a new route from Mound City to Blue Mound, and K-6 from Moran to Kincaid, to become K-52.


K-49

South Endpoint: Junction US 81 in Caldwell

North Endpoint: Junction K-42 near Viola

Counties Served: Sumner, Sedgwick


US 50

Length: 447.700 miles

West Endpoint:
Colorado State Line west of Coolidge (west section 1926-1956; 1956-present)
Junction US 50N/50S/59 west of Baldwin City (east section 1926-1956)

East Endpoint:
Junction US 50N/50S/83 in Garden City (west section 1926-1956)
Missouri State Line in Misson Woods (east section 1926-1956; 1956-1984)
Missouri State Line in Leawood, concurrent with I-435 (1984-present)

Counties Served:
Hamilton, Kearney, Finney, Gray, Ford, Edwards, Stafford, Reno, Harvey, Marion, Chase, Lyon, Coffey, Osage, Franklin, Miami, Johnson

Historic County Served: Douglas (1927-1960)

(More…)


US 50N

Historic West Endpoint:
Junction US 50/US 50S/US 83 in Garden City

Historic East Endpoint:
Junction US 50/US 50S/US 59 west of Baldwin City

Historic Counties Served:
Finney, Hodgeman, Pawnee, Barton, Rice, McPherson, Marion, Dickinson, Morris, Lyon, Osage, Douglas (1926-1956)


US 50S

Historic West Endpoint:
Junction US 50/US 50N/US 83 in Garden City

Historic East Endpoint:
Junction US 50/US 50N/US 59 west of Baldwin City

Historic Counties Served:
Finney, Gray, Ford, Edwards, Stafford, Reno, Harvey, Marion, Chase, Lyon, Coffey, Osage, Franklin, Douglas (1926-1956)


US 50B (Garden City)

Length: 5.233 miles

Northwest Endpoint: US 50/83/400 northwest of Garden City

Southeast Endpoint: US 50/83/400 on Fulton Street in Garden City

County Served: Finney

History

In the late 1970s, plans were made to re-locate US 50 and US 83 around the east and north sides of Garden City. KDOT submitted the relocation, as well as the establishment of an alternate route, at the fall 1979 meeting. AASHTO approved the relocation, and approved the alternate route subject to changing it to a business route. The bypass was opened, and the business route was established, in 1984.

Buisness 50 was designated using the former alignments of US 50 and US 83 through Garden City.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
50B-28/0.0000.000Northwest junction US 50-83-400
(begin US 50B, concurrent with US 83B)
50B-28/0.9530.953North city limits Garden City
50B-28/1.9541.954Taylor Avenue/Kansas Avenue, Garden City
50B-28/2.6332.633Kansas Ave./Main Street/K-156
50B-28/3.3073.307Fulton Street/Main Street/
(US 83B leaves US 50B)
50B-28/4.8294.829East city limits Garden City
50B-28/5.2335.233Southeast junction US 50-83-400
(end US 50B)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
US 50/US 83/US 400 to NCL Garden City5,8308.7%
NCL Garden City to Kansas/Taylor7,0207.2%
Kansas/Taylor to Kansas/Main/K-15611,1004.4%
Kansas/Main/K-156 to Kansas/Fulton2,73016.8%
Kansas/Fulton to ECL Garden City10,3003.5%
ECL Garden City to US 50/US 83/US 4007,6304.8%


US 50 Spur (Garden City)

Histoiric West Endpoint:
Junction US 50, present-day Campus Drive and Fulton Street, Garden City

Historic East Endpoint:
Junction US 156, present-day Campus Drive and Kansas Avenue, Garden City

Historic County Served: Finney (1953-1973)

History

In a resolution passed in December of 1952, the State Highway Commision established a new spur route of US 50S to connect with US 50N east of Garden City.

By 1970, the Garden City city limits had extended out to the US 50 spur, and plans were underway for a new bypass around Garden City to the east and north. A May, 1970 resolution designated this new bypass as a spur of US 83. The new route intersected US 50 and US 156 1/2 mile east of the existing spur route. While the resolution did not specifically remove the US 50 spur, it is probably safe to say that it was withdrawn as a state highway when the parallel segment of the Garden City bypass was opened to traffic by 1973.


US 50B (Dodge City)

Length: 7.889 miles

Historic West Endpoint: US 50 west of Dodge City

Historic East Endpoint: US 50/56/283 northeast of Dodge City

Historic County Served: Ford (1981-2009)

History

At the October 1979 AASHTO meeting, KDOT submitted a proposal to offically designate the northern bypass of Dodge City as US 50 Alternate. AASHTO approved the route on the condition that it be designated as a business route, as AASHTO had done with all of KDOT’s “Alternate Route” proposals. As the Dodge City bypass was a bypass, KDOT withdrew the original proposal and re-submitted it for the November 1980 meeting. The new proposal designated the bypass US 50, with the former US 50 designated as a business route. AASHTO approved the proposal, and KDOT confirmed the change with via resolution in April 1981.

In consideration of a new US 400 bypass on the southwest side of Dodge City, the city agreed to allow Wyatt Earp Boulevard to be turned back to them. This was approved via a highway resolution in April 2008, effective upon the completion of the new US 400. The new bypass was completed in October of 2009.


US 50A (Dodge City)

Historic West Endpoint:
Junction US 50 west of Dodge City

East Endpoint:
Junction US 50/56/283 northeast of Dodge City

Historic County Served:
Ford (1955-1981)

History

In late 1948, A new alignmen for US 50S and US 283 was laid out, cutting diagonally to the southwest from the existing alignment 4 miles east of Dodge City, then turning west to what was then known as Chestnut Street. By 1952, this new corridor was completed, but the highway commission subsequently designated a new northern bypass from where US 50S previously turned south onto Central Avenue, then west about 1 1/4 mile before turning southwest to meet US 50 west of town. By 1955, the northern bypass was completed, and was assigned the designation US 50 Alternate.

The State Highway Commission never sought the inclusion of this route, among others, as part of the US Highway system. After the Highway Commission was reformed into the Kansas Department of Transportation, KDOT submitted this route for approval as a alternate route of US 50. AASHTO approved the request as a business loop at their October 1979 meeting. However, since this route was a bypass, KDOT rejected the conditionally approved designation and re-submitted it for the November 1980 meeting, this time designating the bypass as US 50, and establishing the current US 50 as a business route. AASHTO approved the modified request, and KDOT confirmed the change with via resolution in April 1981.


US 50B (Ottawa)

Previously Designated: US 50 Spur (1962-1979)

Historic Southwest Endpoint: I-35/US 50 exit 182

Northeast Endpoint:
US 59 in Ottawa (As US 50 Spur, 1962-1979)
I-35/US 50 exit 187, concurrent with K-68 (1979-2001)

Historic County Served: Franklin (1962-2001)

History

In 1957, the State Highway Commission passed a resolution adding the future I-35 to the state highway system. The interstate projects were let as an extension of US 50. By 1962, I-35 had been completed between Olathe and Ottawa and the US 50 designation was shifted to the new interstate. The existing US 50 was retained, with the segment between the end of the I-35 project and US 59 in Ottawa designated as a spur of US 50.

The State Highway Commission never sought the inclusion of this route, among others, as part of the US Highway system. After the Highway Commission was reformed into the Kansas Department of Transportation, KDOT submitted this route for approval as a business loop of I-35 and a spur of US 50. AASHTO declined the I-35 business loop request approved the US 50 request as a business loop at their October 1979 meeting. KDOT issued a resolution in 1981 confirming the re-designation, and extending the Business loop to reconnect with I-35 via US 59 and K-68.

In November, 2000, a state resolution was passed removing US 50B from the State Highway System upon the conclusion of a project to rebuild I-35 roadbed in Franklin County. As part of the rebuilding, the bridge over I-35 on old US 50 was demolished and not replaced. The bridge taking old US 50 over southbound US 59 and a former Santa Fe railroad line was also demolished. The approaches to these bridges was abandoned, with the remainder reverting to the city of Ottawa.


K-51

Length: 79.095 miles

West Endpoint: Colorado State Line northwest of Elkhart

East Endpoint: Junction US 83 north of Liberal

Counties Served: Morton, Stevens, Seward


K-52

Length: 23.063 miles

West Endpoint:
US 54 in Moran (1937-1995, concurrent with US 59 1960-1995)
K-31 southwest of Mound City (1995-present)

East Endpoint:Missouri State Line west of Butler, MO

Counties Served: Lynn

Historic Counies Served: Allen, Anderson (1937-1995)

History

In 1937, the State Highway Commission added a new route from Blue Mound to Mound City to the State highway system. This new route, along K-48, K-56, and K-6 from Moran to Kincaid, were combined and designated K-52 to match the connecting Missouri highway number.

In 1962, the Moran-Kincaid segment was designated US 59. K-52 remained signed along US 59 and K-31 between Moran and Blue Mound until 1995, when the redundant signage was removed and K-52 was officially truncated to Blue Mound.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
52-54/0.0000.000K-31 (begin K-52)
52-54/4.3844.384West city limits Mound City
52-54/4.3924.392West junction K-7
52-54/4.6264.626East junction K-7
52-54/5.6265.626East city limits Mound City
52-54/10.917
69-54/7.630
10.917South junction US 69
69-54/9.31412.601E 1100 Road, Pleasanton
69-54/16.393
52-54/19.680
19.680North junction US 69
52-54/23.06323.063Missouri State Line (end K-52)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
K-31 to Mound City85012.4%
West city limits Mound City to K-71,01011.3%
K-7/K-52 concurrency2,7502.9%
North junction K-7 to East city limits Mound City3,3504.9%
Mound City to MP 92,5705.6%
MP 9 to US 691,9207.6%
US 69 from S. junction US 69/K-52 to Pleasanton6,06020.1%
US 69 from Pleasanton to N. junction US 69/K-526,31019.7%
North junction US 69 to Missouri state line1,02011.3%

K-52 (1926-1931)

Historic West Endpoint: K-22 north of Scott City

Historic East Endpoint: K-1/K-4 near La Crosse

Historic Counties Served: Scott, Lane, Ness, Rush (1926-1931)

History

The highway from Scott City to La Crosse was a late addition to the state highway system and was numbered K-52 in the final version of the original highway numbering plan as the lowest number available. Although it was a logical extension of K-4, a separate designation was maintained until 1931, when it was re-designated as K-4.


K-53

Length: 6.177 miles

West Endpoint: Junction US 81 west of Mulvane

East Endpoint: Junction K-15 in Mulvane

County Served: Sumner

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
53-96/0.0000.000US 81 (begin K-53)
53-96/0.6540.654I-35/KTA
53-96/4.6794.679West city limits Mulvane
52-54/5.9575.957East city limits Mulvane
52-54/6.1776.177K-15 (end K-53)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
US 81 to I-35/KTA2,35016.8%
I-35/KTA to Mulvane3,93010.1%
In Mulvane5,0907.2%
Mulvane to K-151,89019.3%

US 54

Length: 380.350 miles

West Endpoint:
Oklahoma State Line southwest of Liberal

East Endpoint:
Missouri State Line east of Fort Scott

Counties Served:
Seward, Meade, Clark, Ford, Kiowa, Pratt, Kingman, Sedgwick, Butler, Greenwood, Woodson, Allen, Bourbon

(More…)


K-55

Length: 12.049 miles

West Endpoint: Junction US 81 west of Belle Plaine

East Endpoint: Junction K-15 in Udall

Counties Served: Sumner, Cowley

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
55-96/0.0000.000US 81 (begin K-55)
55-96/2.4672.467West city limits Mound City
55-96/3.3703.370East city limits Mound City
55-96/10.053
55-18/0.000
10.053Sumner/Cowley county line
54-18/1.90911.962West city limits Udall
54-18/1.99612.049K-15 (end K-55)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
US 81 to Belle Plaine1,8504.1%
In Belle Plaine2,4103.1%
Belle Plaine to MP 52,1003.6%
MP 5 to K-158259.1%

US 56

Length: 471.450 miles

West Endpoint: Oklahoma State Line at Elkhart

East Endpoint: Missouri State Line in Mission Hills

Counties Served:
Morton, Stevens, Seward, Haskell, Gray, Ford, Edwards, Pawnee, Barton, Rice, McPherson, Marion, Dickinson, Morris, Lyon, Osage, Douglas, Johnson

(More…)


US 56 Business

Previously designated: US 56 Alternate (1961-1981)

Length: 2.652 miles

Southwest Endpoint: Junction US 5677 south of Herington

Northeast Endpoint: Junction US 56-77 east of Herington

County Served: Dickinson

History

In 1960, a bypass was built around the east side of Herrington and was designated US 56US 77. The old alignment of US 56 through Herrington was re-designated as an Alternate route for both US 56 and US 77. The State Highway Commission never sought the inclusion of this route, among others, as part of the US Highway system. After the Highway Commission was reformed into the Kansas Department of Transportation, KDOT submitted this route for approval as a alternate route of US 56 and US 77. AASHTO approved the request as a business loop at their October 1979 meeting. KDOT would issue a resolution implementing the change in April, 1981

In December of 1990, KDOT issued a resolution removing the US 77B designation, leaving the route solely as a Business route of US 56.

Junction Guide

KDOT MilepostTotal
Miles
Junction
56B-21/0.0000.000South junction US 56-77 (begin US 56B)
56B-21/1.1671.167South city limits Herrington
56B-21/1.8341.8343rd/Trapp Street, Herrington
56B-21/2.6332.633East city limits Herrington
56B-21/2.6522.652North junction US 56-77 (end US 56B)

AADT (2019)

LocationCountTruck %
South Junction US 56-77 to 3rd/Trapp76017.1%
3rd/Trapp to east city limits Herrington1,6907.1%
East city limits Herrington to
North junction US 56-77
1,37011.7%

K-56 (1926-1936)

Historic West Endpoint: Junction US 73E near Trading Post

Historic East Endpoint: Missouri State Line west of Butler, MO

Historic County Served: Linn (1926-1936)

History

The highway from Trading Post to the Missouri Border was originally slated to be numbered K-24 to match the connecting Missouri highway. However, the addition of US 24 in Missouri caused Missouri to re-number their highway to highway 52. As the number 52 had already been assigned to a route in western Kansas, the highway commission used the lowest number available.

By 1931, the K-52 in western Kansas had been renumbered K-4, thus allowing the number 52 to be used for this route. K-56, along with K-48, a new route from Mound City to Blue Mound, and K-6 from Kincaid to Moran, was designated K-52 in 1937.


K-56 (1937-1954)

Historic West Endpoint: Junction K-23 west of Fowler (1937-1954)

Historic East Endpoint: Junction US 54 south of Fowler (1937-1954)

Historic County Served: Meade (1937-1954)


K-57

Length: 31.200 miles

Northwest Endpoint: 
US 40 at Junction City (1926-1960)
I-70/US 40 near Grandview Plaza (1960-1968)
US 77 northeast of Milford Dam (1968-present)

Southeast Endpoint:
Missouri State Line near Opolis (1926-2003)
US 169 near Colony (2003-2004)
K-4 at Dwight (2004-present)

Counties Served: Geary, Morris

Historic Counties Served:
Chase, Lyon, Greenwood, Coffey, Anderson (1926-2004)
Allen, Neosho, Crawford (1926-2003)


K-58

Length: 46.761 miles

West Endpoint: Junction K-99 at Madison

East Endpoint: US 169 near Colony

Counties Served: Greenwood, Coffey, Anderson


K-58 (1926-1978)

Historic Southwest Endpoint:
US 50 near Lenexa

Historic Northeast Endpoint:
US 73E in Overland Park (1926-1936)
K-5 at 18th Street and Quindaro in Kansas City (1936-1978)

Historic Counties Served:
Johnson (1926-1978), Wyandotte (1936-1978)

History

It is likely that the Lenexa-Overland Park route was added to the state highway system just after the original numbering plan for Kansas highways was implemented, and the number was assigned in sequence.

In 1936, most of US 73E south of Kansas City was re-numbered as an extension of US 69. As a result, K-58 was extended north along US 69 to Southwest Boulevard, then replaced US 73E along Antoine Road, Strong Avenue, and Goddard Street to Argentine Boulevard, crossed the Kansas River on the Argentine Bridge, then turned north along 18th Street to K-5 at Quindaro Boulevard.

The great flood of 1951 damaged the Argentine bridge, resulting in its permanent closure. When its replacement, the 18th Street Expressway, was completed in 1956, K-58 was routed onto the Shawnee Mission Parkway from Metcalf to Roe, then north on Roe to the 18th Street Expressway.

K-58 was removed from the state highway system upon the passage of the 1978 legislature’s Proposal No. 61, which disallowed intra-city highways.


US 59

Length: 210.439 miles

South Endpoint:
Oklahoma State Line South of Chatopa

North Endpoint:
Missouri State Line at Atchison

Counties Served:
Labette, Neosho, Allen, Anderson, Franklin, Douglas, Jefferson, Atchison

(More…)


K-59 (1926-1936)

Length: 1.5 miles

Historic South Endpoint: North City Limits of Halstead

Historic North Endpoint: Junction US 50S north of Halstead

Historic County Served: Harvey

History:

K-59 was the original number for the spur from Halstead to US 50S. The number was assigned in sequence. It was graded between 1930 and 1932.

K-59 was renumbered to K-89 in 1936 to allow the number 59 to be used for the newly designated US 59.